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Biological Effect Tetra-Branched Anti-TNF-Peptide and Coating Ratio-Dependent Penetration of the Peptide-Conjugated Cerium3/4+ Cation-Stabilized Gamma-Maghemite Nanoparticles into Rat Inner Ear after Transtympanic Injection Visualized By MRI

Jing.Zou@staff.uta.fi
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The Role of Nanotechnology in Semiconductor Industry: Review Article

Nanotechnology is now the key area of technology to create and manipulate materials at the nanometre (nm or 10-9 m) scale either by bottom up from single groups of atoms to bulk matter or by top down which is reducing bulk materials to a group of atom. Now a days it is being used or considered for use for fabricating and constructing many efficient electronic devices which have extremely large surface area to volume ratio, this makes a large number of surface or interfacial atoms, resulting in more surface dependent material properties specially this technology is used in semiconductor industry or solar cell industry.
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Screening and Basic Workup of a Patient with Peripheral Vascular Disease – A Primer of Physicians

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a prevalent condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality in a variety of patient populations.
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Long Exposure to CdS-Dextrin Nanoparticles Induces an Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Rats

Male Wistar rats were treated daily and intraperitoneally with CdS-Dextrin nanoparticles (100 μg/kg) during 30, 60, and 90 days. The effect of subacute and chronic administration of CdS-Dextrin nanoparticles on CD4/CD8 subpopulations of thymocytes, spleen-derived T cells, and peripheral blood CD4/CD8/CD3 T cells were analyzed by flow cytometer using a Rat T Lymphocyte Cocktail. An indirect ELISA kit analyzed cytokine Th1/Th2 levels. A DNA content and cell cycle analysis was carried out in bone marrow cells by flow cytometry. We also analyzed the presence of CdS-Dextrin nanoparticles in the thymus and spleen.
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Structural, Elemental and Molecular Characterization of Normal And Osteoarthritic Human Articular Cartilage

The articular cartilage overlying the bone consists of a network of collagen fibres. This network is essential to cartilage integrity, usually suffering damage in degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. We have been applying a number of techniques to study the bone-cartilage interface and of changes occurring in this with disease. The bone-cartilage samples with disease were investigated for their structural, elemental and molecular properties. The bone-cartilage samples with disease were characterized by scanning electron microscopy- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy.
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Nutritional Status Assessment of Children with Nutritional Rickets Under Five Years at District Headquarter Hospital, Upper Dir- Pakistan

A cross- sectional study was conducted to assess the nutritional status of the children with rickets aged <5 years at District Headquarter Hospital, Upper Dir in which 50 children were included 33 (66%) male and 17 (34%) female. The study included anthropometric measurement (weight, height and head circumference), clinical presentation, radiographic findings, biochemical assessments, dietary status and information about exposure to sun. clinical results reveal that all children were having one or more clinical signs and symptoms of nutritional rickets including rachitic rosary (14%), widely open anterior fontanel (22%), widening of wrist (14%), bowing of legs (14%), chest infection (22%), diarrhea (10%), delayed eruption of teeth (24%), failure to thrive (10%), fits (4%), sweating (26%) and irritability (20%).
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Assessment of Autonomic Function in Subjects Practicing Yoga Using Spectral Analysis and Approximate Entropy Method

Autonomic nervous system involvement in subjects practicing Yoga has rarely been studied and has shown conflicting results. Our main purpose was to assess the effect of Yoga on autonomic function of group of subjects practicing Yoga regularly in comparison with another group with normal control subjects by measuring the frequency gain response of the two groups. Other aim of this study was to determine wither the duration of Yoga practicing correlated with measures of heart rate variability signal (HRV) using approximate entropy index (ApEn).
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Investigation of Graphene Oxide in Diesel Soot

NanotechnologyAbstractIntroductionGraphene has emerged as a potential material in various scientific disciplines, ranging from material science, engineering, and more recently biomedicine. The paper describes the investigation of the presence of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) in the carbon soot of internal combustion diesel engines. The UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X- ray diffraction (XRD), Photoluminescent (PL) and Raman spectroscopic analysis of the sample provided a conclusive evidence of the formation of graphene and GO. The Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectrum (EDX) of the sample show carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) of size less than 50nm.
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Dental Implant Complications –Systemic Diseases- PART-I

Although dental implants have been a successful option for replacement of lost dentition for nearly five decades, their use in the medical and dental treatment plan is still in its youth. Literature on the medical implications of dental implants is surprisingly sparse, with a need for organization. This review is an attempt to begin the process of documenting the science behind this complex, yet critical topic.
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Wilkie’s Syndrome in an Adolescent: A Rare Etiology of Upper Intestinal Obstruction

Wilkie’s Syndrome (WS) was described in 1927 and its physiopathology is related to the formation of an abnormal acute aortomesenteric angle measuring between 7o and 22o. It leads to digestive symptoms due to external compression of mesentery artery against the third portion of duodenum. This is a case of WS in a young, tall and slim male patient. Three months before, he began postprandial vomiting, abdominal pain, hyporexia and weight loss. The diagnostis was made by an upper gastrointestinal series with barium contrast and confirmed by Laparotomy. Duodenojejunostomy is a well-known technique and it was successfully performed in this case.
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The Use of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Cancer Patients with Heart Failure

Investigate the use of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in cancer patients with heart failure (HF); assess factors associated with ischemic and non-ischemic HF. Many newer cancer therapies are cardiotoxic; thus, the incidence of HF has been increasing in this high-risk patient population. CRT has beneficial effects on morbidity, mortality, and left ventricular function in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, yet cancer patients and survivors who develop severe HF and are eligible for CRT often does not receive it.
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Complex Chronic Patients and Atrial Fibrillation: Association with Cognitive Deterioration and Heart Failure

In developed countries, around 3-5% of the people could be identified as chronic complex patients, and they are increasingly at risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) and cognitive impairment. The main objective of this study was to present the current findings on the association between AF and cognitive impairment and mortality risk among chronic complex outpatients (CCP). A multicenter and prospective cohort study of mortality incidence was carried out from 1 January 2013 to 30 September 2016 in a sample of 932 adult patients registered as CCP. To predict hazard ratios, mean survival time, and survival probabilities, a multivariate Cox regression was used.
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Evaluating the Effect of Oprelvekin on Cardiac Repolarization in Subjects with Chemotherapy-Induced Thrombocytopenia: An Observational Chart Review of a Phase 2 Clinical Trial in Laredo, Texas

This study tested for the cardiac effects of Oprelvekin, recombinant human interleukin-11, a thrombopoietic growth factor, in patients afflicted with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia (platelet count<50,000 cells/ul). Chart-reviews of patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria of: 18-75 yrs of age, non-myeloid malignancy, with adequate hematologic, hepatic and renal parameters and normal electrocardiograms that were enrolled in this phase 2 trial were analyzed. Patients of child-bearing potential agreed to be on a reliable form of birth control for the duration of the study. Results on 4 patients suggest that Oprelvekin does not cause atrial nor ventricular arrhythmia, a rare severe cardiac side effect, in treating patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.
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Artificial Placenta: A Novel Approach for Preterm Neonates: Review of Literature

Preterm birth is one of the most common causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, the mortality and morbidity are very high in extremely preterm infants born before 28 completed weeks of gestation or those with extremely low birth weight for gestational age (<1000 g). One of the major causes for such a high morbidity and mortality in such infants is respiratory insufficiency, due to poor lung maturity. To overcome these problems and to reduce overall burden of morbidity and mortality associated with immature pulmonary development in preterm neonates, the concept of “artificial placenta” came into picture, which is basically a pump less lung assisted device connected to umbilical vessels that helps in gaseous exchange in neonates with severe respiratory insufficiency.
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Equines as Tools Vs Partners: A Critical Look at the Uses and Beliefs Surrounding Horses in Equine Therapies and Argument for Mechanical Horses

Horses have their own unique status as therapy animals due to their function in both physical and psychotherapies. Current models of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) utilize horses for a range of physical, psychological and learning therapies to benefit humans, often referring to horses as therapeutic “partners”. To fulfill certification requirements for existing models of EAAT, practitioners are required to study equine behavior through the belief systems currently modeled in the natural horsemanship community. Despite requiring knowledge in horse behavior, studies and anecdotal evidence suggests that horses used in EAAT commonly display confusion or escape behaviors, “burn out” and/or display signs of depression. These behaviors could be a result of contradictions in the interpretation of equine behavior within the natural horsemanship practices or a lack of understanding and utilization of equine learning theory within the context of EAAT.
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Anodizing for Design and Function

Two basic reactions occur during the anodizing of aluminum: 1) the aluminum is consumed and 2) an oxide grows. By accepting this statement as true, the anodizing process can be viewed as a corrosion process, and anodizing can be modeled using the Tafel Equation. Anodizing process parameters of electrolyte chemistry and concentration, temperature, aluminum substrate resistance and current density are presented as they relate to the Tafel Equation and how they impact the anodic aluminum oxide structure and properties. Understanding this relationship is consequent in making anodizing an engineering process, one that enables tuning the structure such that it yields distinct characteristics to fulfill design and application requirements.
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Recent Developments in Human Odor Detection Technologies

Human odor detection technologies have drawn attention due to the wide possibility of potential applications they open up in areas such as biometrics, criminal investigation and forensics, search for survivors under rubble, and security checkpoint screening. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been the most successful and powerful analytical approach developed to date for human odor analysis, and hundreds of human odorants have been identified using this tool.
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Electronic-nose Applications in Forensic Science and for Analysis of Volatile Biomarkers in the Human Breath

The application of electronic-nose (E-nose) technologies in forensic science is a recent new development following a long history of progress in the development of diverse applications in the related biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. Data from forensic analyses must satisfy the needs and requirements of both the scientific and legal communities. The type of data collected from electronic-nose devices provides a means of identifying specific types of information about the chemical nature of evidentiary objects and samples under investigation using aroma signature profiles of complex gaseous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from manufactured products and parts of the human body. E-nose analyses also provide useful qualitative information about the physicochemical characteristics and metabolic conditions of human subjects without the need for time-consuming analyses to identify all chemical components in human-derived volatile mixtures.
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Analysis of Sweat Simulant Mixtures using Multiplexed Arrays of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Vapor Sensors

Carbon nanotube (NT) based electronic vapor sensors were tested against synthetic sweat solutions, consisting of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in saline, in order to probe the device ability to analyze and differentiate vapors derived from complex biological samples.
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Characteristic Human Scent Compounds Trapped on Natural and Synthetic Fabrics as analyzed by SPME-GC/MS

The collection of human odor volatiles is of interest to forensic applications as a path to investigate canine scent discriminations in legal investigations. A study using a selected array of previously identified human odor compounds has been conducted to determine the retention and release capabilities of five (5) natural and synthetic fabric types, cotton (mercerized fabric and gauze matrix), polyester, rayon and wool.
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The Effects of the Film Thickness and Roughness in the Anodization Process of Very Thin Aluminum Films

The anodization of aluminum foils having micrometer thickness is a common process and results in hexagonally self-ordered alumina membranes. However, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes fabricated from nanometer-thin films present new challenges to the anodization process, since aluminum films adheres poorly on supporting substrates and the smoothness of the film is highly related to the kind of substrate.
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Anodic Oxidation of Titanium in Sulphuric Acid and Phosphoric Acid Electrolytes

Anodisation of pure titanium has been carried out in sulphuric and in phosphoric acid solutions at potentials ranging from 50 to 150V. The SEM and AFM morphological analysis indicates that, within this potential range, oxidation in sulphuric acid solution produces better developed mesoporous oxide layers.
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Fabrication of Ordered Arrays of Anodic Aluminum Oxide Pores with Interpore Distance Smaller than the Pitch of Nano-pits formed by Ion Beam Etching

We investigated a method for preparation of ordered nanopore arrays with the interpore distance of 60 nm by guided self-organization of anodic aluminum oxide with a prepatterned array of pits in the starting Al film.
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Preparation of Large Area Anodic Alumina Membranes and their Application to Thin Film Fuel Cell

The design of an electrochemical reactor for the preparation of self-supported comparatively thin (up to 10 μm) and large area (up to 50 cm2) anodic alumina membranes is described allowing growth of porous alumina at high applied potential (up to 150 V) without burning.
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Fabrication of Vertical Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanowire Arrays by Two-Step Electroplating Method into Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template

Vertical Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanowire arrays have been synthesized via two-step electroplating method into anodized aluminum oxide template. For deposition of CZTS nanowires, anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) was used as the growth mask for the growth of the nanowires. AAO templates with hole sizes of 70 nm in diameter were used in the experiments.
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Fabrication and Luminescence of Anodic Alumina with Incorporated Vanadyl Citrate Chelate Anions

Anodic aluminum oxide doped with vanadyl citrate chelate complex anions was formed by a two-step self-organized anodization in 2 wt. % sulfuric acid containing 0.04 M V2O5 and 0.08 M citric acid at voltage range 13-23 V, and at 0 and 15 oC. The combination of two temperatures and at least four voltages (depending on the applied temperature) was applied as the operating conditions of anodization.
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Synthesis of BaTiO3 Nanowires via Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template Method Assisted by Vacuum-and-Drop Loading

In this paper, we report on the synthesis of BaTiO3 nanowires via the anodic aluminum oxide template method. To fill in the precursors of BaTiO3 into anodic aluminum oxide templates, the vacuum and drop loading method developed in our previous study was used. Ba(CH3COO)2 (barium acetate) and C12H28O4Ti (tetraisopropyl orthotitanate) were used as Ba and Ti sources, respectively. Anodic aluminum oxide membranes with the through-hole diameter of ~200 nm were used as the template for BaTiO3 nanowires.
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Editorial Board Members Related to ART

SIBYLLE KRANZ

Associate Professor
Department of Nutrition Science
Purdue University
United States

Hui Xiao

Associate Professor
Department of Pathology
Yeshiva University
United States

HSING-LIN WANG

Chemistry Division
Los Alamos National Laboratory
United States

Walter J. Lukiw

Professor
Neurology, Neuroscience and Ophthalmology
Louisiana State University
United States

Lufang Zhou

Lufang Zhou
Assistant Professor
The University of Alabama
Birmingham
United Kingdom

HEMANT S. AGARWAL

Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics
University of New Mexico
United States

Charles C. Muscoplat

Professor
Department of Food Science and Nutrition
University of Minnesota
United States

IRA D ZINNER

Clinical Professor
Department of Prosthodontics
New York University
United States

Lili Chen

Associate Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology
Fox Chase Cancer Center
United States

ILANA B. ADDIS

Associate Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Arizona College of Medicine
United States
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