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Articles Related to Bilirubin

Utility of Serum Bilirubin Screening during the First 24-Hours Following Birth of Pre-Term Neonates <35 Weeks’ Gestation

Neonates with severe hyperbilirubinaemia are at increased risk for neurological morbidity. Risk factors for early onset hyperbilirubinaemia include prematurity, red cell haemolysis and birth trauma. As most neonates are asymptomatic and clinical evaluation in detecting early jaundice limited, clinical practice guidelines at the Royal Women’s Hospital recommend a serum bilirubin (SBR) level in the first 24 hours following birth for neonates <35 weeks’ gestation. Our audit aims to describe the utility of SBR screening in this population
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A Rare Coexistence: Omphalomesenteric Remnant with Appendix and Caecum Duplication

The nutrition source of developing embryo at early stages is the omphalomesenteric duct which obliterates latter. Failure of this obliteration process brings on omphalomesenteric remnants.
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Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type III and Primary Hemochromatosis; Coexistence of Mutations in KIF23 and HFE

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III (CDA III) can be caused by mutation in KIF23. CDA III differs from CDA I and II in the sense that secondary hemochromatosis has not been reported. However, we have observed elevated serum ferritin in a CDA III family.
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Ascites Secondary to Compression of the Caudal Vena Cava by Liver Abscesses in a Cow

Ascites due to thrombosis of the caudal vena cava is relatively seldom in cattle. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of ascites secondary to compression of the caudal vena cava by liver abscesses. This case report describes the findings in a 3.7-year-old Brown Swiss cow with this disease.
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Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (Flutd) – An Emerging Problem of Recent Era

Feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) is a supposed to a life threatening condition in cats, especially in males (Toms), when obstructive. Early diagnosis and treatment is necessary otherwise it may lead to death. Condition appears with stranguria, pollakiuria, dysuria and sometime in severe conditions hematuria and anuria may be present. Similar five cases of age ranging from 3-6 years, with common history of commercial feed and indoor placement were examined during the course of 3 month. Firstly clinical evaluation including clinical parameters and physical manipulation was done followed by laboratory tests. Complete blood count (CBC) didn’t give any significant change but urinalysis results were quite doubtful with high values of specific gravity (SP), pH, erythrocyte, bacterial and leukocyte count.
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Sarcoidosis - A Case of “Resistant Tuberculosis”

Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It usually has a benign course, but those cases with multi system involvement have poorer prognosis. Sarcoidosis is an under diagnosed disease in India, probably due to the close resemblance to tuberculosis and the lack of awareness. But this disease is not so rare in India, as previously thought.
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Anti-Arthritic Efficacy And Safety Of Crominex 3+ (Trivalent Chromium, Phyllanthus emblica Extract, And Shilajit) In Moderately Arthritic Dogs

The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of Crominex 3+ (a complex of trivalent chromium, Phyllanthus emblica (Amla) extract and purified Shilajit) in moderately arthritic dogs.
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Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Arthritic Efficacy and Safety of Purified Shilajit in Moderately Arthritic Dogs

The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of purified Shilajit in moderately arthritic dogs. Ten client-owned dogs in a randomized double-blinded study received either a placebo or Shilajit (500 mg) twice daily for a period of five months. Dogs were evaluated each month for physical condition (body weight, body temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate) and pain associated with arthritis (overall pain, pain from limb manipulation, and pain after physical exertion).
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Editorial Board Members Related to Bilirubin

PHILIP ROSENTHAL

Professor
Departments of Pediatrics and Surgery
University of California
United States

Robert Kinobe

Senior Lecturer
Physiology and Pharmacology
School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Australia
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