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Articles Related to Body Mass Index

Modeling of Longitudinal Factors on Children Body Mass Index at Bahir Dar Districts: Linear Mixed-Effects Model

Body mass index is calculated as weight in kilograms divided by square height in meters (kg/m2 ). Its formula was developed by Belgium Statistician, and was known as the Quetelet Index [1]. It provides a reliable indicator of body fatness for most people and is used to screen weight categories that may lead to health problems.
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The Association Between Strength, Balance and Physical Function with the Body Mass Index in Dyslipidemia

The coexistence of chronic diseases has led to greater negativity in patients than the negativity of diseases individually speaking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the body mass index on metabolic profile, isometric and isokinetic muscle strength, static and dynamic balance, and anaerobic capacity in dyslipidemia patients, as well as to emphasize what exercises should be recommended for recovering the experienced functional loss of the patients. Forty five patients (26 women, 19 men) between 40 and 75 years of age and who were newly diagnosed as dyslipidemia were enrolled into this study. The patients were divided into two groups according to their body mass indexes (BMI): group 1 (n:18) or those whose BMI was lower than 25 kg/m2, and group 2 (n:27) or those whose BMI was higher than 30 kg/m2. Biochemical blood sampling was done. The Get Up and Go, single leg stance, anaerobic capacity, and isometric as well as isokinetic muscle strength tests were performed in order to evaluate functional capacities. There were no statistically significant differences shown at gender distribution, age, or height (p>0.05) between groups. The weight and BMI’s between the groups were statistically significantly different (p<0.05). The fasting glucose levels and triglyceride levels of group 2 was statistically significantly higher than group 1 (p<0.05), whereas other biochemical parameters showed no differences (p>0.05). The static balance tests results between groups have shown no statistically significant differences (p<0.05); however the dynamic balance test results for group 2 was statistically significantly worse than those of group 1 (p<0.05). The parameters of the results of the anaerobic testing, alongside those of the isometric and isokinetic testing for group 1 patients were statistically significantly higher than those of group 2 (p<0.05). Obesity negatively affects dyslipidemic patients’ metabolic and functional capacities. An exercise program for dyslipidemic patients with a high BMI should include strengthening and balance as well as dynamic balance exercises in order to positively influence both their metabolic profiles and functional status.
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Gingival Stimulation: An Important Metabolic Regulator?

This study aimed to determine whether a relationship exists between gingival stimulation and the levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and glucose, which are important regulators of energy homeostasis. Blood samples for ghrelin, leptin, glucose and insulin were taken from 15 male volunteers (mean age 25.5±2.3 years; mean body mass index 24.4±2.79 kg/m2), who did not brush their teeth for one day, after a 12 h-long overnight fasting and before standard breakfast (0 min) and thereafter at 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after breakfast. After toothbrushing after dinner and after a 12 h-long overnight fasting, blood samples were taken again before standard breakfast (0 min) and then after at the same time points following tooth brushing.A significant reduction was found in the leptin levels measured at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min after tooth brushing (p < 0.005). The ghrelin levels also declined at these time points but were significant at 0, 30 and 120 min (p < 0.05). Despite the reduced insulin levels at 120 and 180 min after tooth brushing (p < 0.05), no significant change was observed in the glucose levels.
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Physician and Patient Perspective to Weight Gain in Pregnancy

Gaining weight outside of the Institute of Medicine guidelines puts a woman and her foetus at an increased risk. Limited or incorrect information is being provided to women during antenatal care. Research shows that physicians do not perceive this as an important issue. We aimed to assess both physician and patient perspective to weight gain in pregnancy as well as assessing physicians current practice to weight management. 71% of women want to be given a target weight to gain during pregnancy; 87% want to be told if they are gaining an inappropriate amount of weight. 87.5% of physicians believe that weight management is important; 31.2% advise patients about weight gain.
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Perceived Barriers to Maintaining Healthy Body Weight among Saudi Women of Reproductive Age in Jeddah City

Maintaining a healthy body weight is important for overall health and can help prevent and control many chronic conditions. However, the information surrounding the barriers to healthy eating (HE) and physical activity (PA) for weight maintenance among Saudi women of reproductive age is insufficient to design and develop intervention programs. To explore personal, social, and physical environmental factors that act as barriers to maintaining a healthy weight and how these barriers vary by socio-demographic and weight status. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 using a stratified two-stage cluster sampling design comprising 408 Saudi women attending 12 Jeddah Primary Health Centers (JPHCCs). Data was collected using a structured questionnaire consisting of socio-demographic factors, eating habits (EHs), PA, and perceived barriers to a maintenance of healthy weight maintenance. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) data also were obtained.
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Metabolic Syndrome in Indigenous Amerindian Women in Suriname; Less on Waist and More on Weight?

The indigenous Amerindian populations living in the southern interior part of Suriname have to date largely maintained their traditional hunter-gatherer life-style. In this study we compared the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MeTS) and its component risk factors between indigenous Amerindian women of the interior of Suriname, with indigenous Amerindian women living in the coastal-rural areas who have a more urbanized lifestyle. We focused on women since the Suriname Health study showed that Indigenous women had the second highest MeTS prevalence nationwide.
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Factors associated with obesity among Saudi women of reproductive age in Jeddah City

Previous studies have shown that women who are overweight or obese are at risk for adverse reproductive outcomes, including infertility, gestational diabetes, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. However, information surrounding the risk factors for obesity among Saudi women of reproductive age is deficient due to the limited number of studies that assessed obesity prevalence among them.
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Wilkie’s Syndrome in an Adolescent: A Rare Etiology of Upper Intestinal Obstruction

Wilkie’s Syndrome (WS) was described in 1927 and its physiopathology is related to the formation of an abnormal acute aortomesenteric angle measuring between 7o and 22o. It leads to digestive symptoms due to external compression of mesentery artery against the third portion of duodenum. This is a case of WS in a young, tall and slim male patient. Three months before, he began postprandial vomiting, abdominal pain, hyporexia and weight loss. The diagnostis was made by an upper gastrointestinal series with barium contrast and confirmed by Laparotomy. Duodenojejunostomy is a well-known technique and it was successfully performed in this case.
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Case Report: Are We Prepared to Manage Acute Abdomen in the Super-Obese Patient?

A 55 year-old man with signs and symptoms of severe sepsis was admitted to the emergency department. He is severely obese with a BMI of 80 Kg/ m2 and a medical history of hypertension and arrhythmia. The abdominal pain was non-specific and the physical examination was impaired by obesity. Ultrasonography (US) was ineffective and no computed tomography (CT) scan was available for a patient of his weight. The acute abdomen presented an inflammatory etiology. The patient underwent laparoscopy and severe cholecystitis was diagnosed and treated. The patient recovered well, and remained for 36h in the intensive care unit and 5 days in the surgical ward.
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Physical Activity and the Prevalence of General and Abdominal Obesity among Saudi Women of Reproductive Age in Jeddah City

Obesity and physical inactivity are growing problems that are associated with major health problems. However, the current information on the association between obesity and physical activity (PA) in Saudi women of reproductive age is insufficient to design and develop intervention programs. To explore the rates of two types of obesity (general and abdominal obesity) and the level of PA and to evaluate the relationship between obesity risk factors, the use of exercise equipment at home, A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 using a stratified two-stage cluster sample. The sampling weight and design effect were incorporated into the analysis. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) data were collected from all participants.and obesity measurements.
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Self-Experiencing “The Healthiest Weight”

The Ideal Weight has been an interesting topic for years. The Healthiest Weight should be accurate and unique for everyone. Current methods use the BMI (Body Mass Index) as an indicator of a person’s optimal weight. However, BMI has some issues, leading to inefficient weight management programs. Successful programs should consider the optimal timing for the brain control of weight-presetting, the fundamental of the Lipostat theory, not yet reported in humans. In this study, the bases for successful Weight Management Programs are proposed by BMI sub-categorization, current state-of-the-art mobile technology and self-experimentation. This is the first reported long-term human self-experiment involving successful weight loss, metabolic adaptation and weight-presetting, consistent with the Lipostat theory. New concepts and ideas are raised, setting up the bases for further experimental investigations.
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Parental Midlife Body Shape Influences Offspring Self-Perception of Weight in a Cohort of Australian Adults

Self-perception and measures of body weight and central adiposity are key indicators of a population’s attitude and level of concern regarding obesity. Parental weight has been shown to be a strong determinant of adult offspring weight. This study initially investigates the association between self-perception, and measured body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and characterised this association by perception type (pessimist, optimist and realist).
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Clinical Utility of Triglyceride: HDL-Cholesterol Ratio as a Surrogate Marker of Inflammation in Pediatric Obesity

The prognostic utility of the triglyceride: HDL-cholesterol (TG:HDL-C) ratio, a marker for insulin resistance, is unknown among high-risk children and adolescents. We examined the clinical utility of TG:HDL-C ratio as a marker of insulin resistance and chronic inflammation in obese youth.
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Association between Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism of ApoB Gene with Dyslipidemia and Obesity Risk in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Several studies have suggested that Insertion/Deletion polymorphism of ApoB gene is associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD).
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The Prevalence of Obesity among Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease – Cross Sectional Study of Sri Lanka Population

The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is growing rapidly around the world, particularly in Asia. Over the last two decades Sri Lanka has experienced an epidemic of CKD, especially in the “Mahaweli” river basin in North Central region of the island that was not attributable to conventional risk factors - hence widely termed “CKD-unknown”.
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Editorial Board Members Related to Body Mass Index

Aladin M Boriek

Professor
Department of Medicine
Baylor College of Medicine
United States
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