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Articles Related to Hemorrhage

Schwannoma Palate in Children: Rare Case

Schwannoma is a benign tumor that originates from the presence of Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. They are usually asymptomatic, do not recur, and malignant transformation is rare.
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Sacrococcygeal Teratoma in a Developing Community

An epidemiologic data pool was formed from cases of SCT submitted as surgical specimens to a Reference Pathology Laboratory serving the Igbo Ethnic Group in South-Eastern Nigeria.
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Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma Accompanying Hemorrhage in the Pleural Cavity

Malignant fibrous histiocytoma is a type of soft tissue tumor that frequently occurs in the limbs, trunk, retroperitoneum, etc. We herein report a case of MFH occurring in the thoracic wall, which was accompanied by hemorrhage in the pleural cavity. A 79-year-old male transferred to our hospital for a detailed examination of a chest wall tumor in his right back. The tumor was diagnosed as pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) by an incisional biopsy.
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Optic Nerve Cavernous Haemangioma as a Rare Cause of Retro-Orbital Pain mimicking Intracranial Aneurysm.

Cavernous haemangiomas of the optic nerve, optic chiasm or optic tract are rare. Usually they present with acute onset of symptoms such as acute decline of visual acuity, headaches, nausea or even decline of the level of consciousness which suggests haemorrhage in or even out of the lesion. Otherwise, they have an insidious clinical pattern with subacute or chronic visual disturbance, diplopia and retro- orbital pain.
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Wake-up Strokes Are Similar to Known-Onset Morning Strokes in Severity and Outcome

Stroke symptoms noticed upon waking, wake-up stroke, account for up to a quarter of all acute ischemic strokes. Patients with wake-up stroke, however, are often excluded from thrombolytic therapy.
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Procalcitonin versus C-Reactive Protein in Neonatal Sepsis

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in febrile children younger than 3 months, with reported rates ranging from 5% to 20% depending on different series. Neonates and infants up to age 2 months who have pyelonephritis usually do not have symptoms localized to the urinary tract.
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Editorial Board Members Related to Hemorrhage

CHIA-YI KUAN

Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics
Center for Neurodegenerative Disease
Emory University School of Medicine
United States

Luis Ulloa

Associate Professor
Department of Surgery
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School
United States
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