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Articles Related to IgE

How the Artificial Intelligence Tool Psumo-CD is working for Predicting Sumoylation Sites in Proteins

In 2016 a very powerful AI (artificial intelligence) tool has been established for predicting sumoylation sites in proteins, one of the most important post modifications in proteins [1].
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Overweight and Obesity and their Relationship with Glucose Dysregulation in the Nigerian Youth

Fasting plasma glucose is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in obese children. This study aimed to evaluate the association between WC, BMI and WHtR and blood glucose in children.
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Blood Type Distribution in Patients Attending the Laboratory of Yalgado Ouedraogo University Hospital, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

Determining erythrocyte antigens is a crucial and preventive procedure in case of any immunohematology accident.
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In vitro Digestibility of Indian Bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) Leaves Associated with Stylosanthes guianensisin Ruminants

The study of the in vitrodigestibility of Indian bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) leaves associated with Stylosanthes guianensisin ruminants was conducted in April 2019 in the Animal Production and Nutrition Research Unit of the University of Dschang. A bovine ruminal fluid, a source of energy (B. vulgaris) and a nitrogen source (S.guianensis) with or without polyethylene glycol (PEG) were used. A sample of rations based on B. vulgarisassociated with 0; 20 and 30% of S.guianensis, with or without PEG was removed, dried and milled to determine the chemical composition and evaluation of in vitrodigestibility. Results of this study showed that the addition of legume increased the total nitrogen content (MAT) (12.87, 13.03 and 13.56% DM) when the B. vulgariswas associated with 0; 20 and 30% S.guianensis.
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Effects of Planting Dates on Nutritional and Phytochemical Compositions of Onion Varieties Under Rain-fed and Irrigation Facilities in Ogbomoso, Nigeria

Onion is a high-value vegetable consumed in Nigeria on a daily basis, and it forms an integral part of the diet, but the nutritional quality is low due to lack of appropriate cultural practices. The study examined the effects of planting dates on the nutritional quality of onion varieties in Ogbomoso, Nigeria. Five onion varieties (Local white, a local red, karibou, gandiol+, and safari) were subjected into four different planting dates namely, two under rain-fed (early April and August) and two under irrigation (early September and November).
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The Development of Reference Values for Waist Circumference and Waist Height Ratios in Nigerian Youths 10-18 Years of Age

In Nigeria, indices predictive of adolescent central adiposity are lacking. This study aimed to develop age- and gender- specific cut-offs for WC and WHtR for Nigerian adolescents
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Eating Patterns, Dietary Diversity and the Nutritional Status of Children Residing in Orphanages in Southwestern Nigeria

The population of orphaned children is increasing at devastating levels especially in sub-Saharan Africa.
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Automated Polyp Detection System in Colonoscopy Using Deep Learning and Image Processing Techniques

Undetected colonic polyps are considered a major cause of interval cancer of the colon. The Automatic Polyp Detection System (APDS) (Magentiq Eye LTD, Haifa, Israel) was developed to enhance the ability of endoscopists to detect polyps during screening colonoscopy. It is designed to be used both in real-time and offline. APDS runs directly on the video output of the endoscopic camera and highlights the polyp on the screen. APDS utilizes the power of Deep Learning and Computer Vision in order to improve polyp detection rates thus improving the performance of the endoscopist.
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Automated Polyp Detection System in Colonoscopy Using Deep Learning and Image Processing Techniques

Undetected colonic polyps are considered a major cause of interval cancer of the colon. The Automatic Polyp Detection System (APDS) (Magentiq Eye LTD, Haifa, Israel) was developed to enhance the ability of endoscopists to detect polyps during screening colonoscopy. It is designed to be used both in real-time and offline. APDS runs directly on the video output of the endoscopic camera and highlights the polyp on the screen. APDS utilizes the power of Deep Learning and Computer Vision in order to improve polyp detection rates thus improving the performance of the endoscopist.
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Analysis of Rice Production and Consumption Trends in Nigeria

One of the overarching goals of Nigeria agriculture development programs and policies is increasing agricultural productivity for accelerated economic growth. Despite the various policies measures to increase crop production, domestic rice production has not been increased enough to meet the rising population of the country “Nigeria”.
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Palynological and Lithological Investigation of Forensic Materials at the University of Lagos, Nigeria: First Experimental Palynological Approach in Nigeria

Security agencies are always saddled with huge responsibilities of trying to establish evidences to link a suspect to a particular crime. But in most cases, there are always very limited physical evidences due to the complexity of the crime. However, forensic palynology provides a very good option, because pollen and spores from plants are very minute, ubiquitous in distribution and are seldom useful in recovery of vegetation of a certain locality. This present study aims to assess the feasibility of pollen, spores, and sand grains as associative evidences recovered from a suspect linked with a crime scene. Forensic materials including soil samples from foot wear, dirt from clothes, earlobes and nostrils were retrieved from the body of a suspect at a particular location in Nigeria. The retrieved materials were subjected to standard laboratory palynological, biochemical and lithological procedures. The dionex analysis (anion) and atomic absorption spectrometry (cation) shows great similarity in the results obtained with an exception to Zinc. A considerable similarity was observed in the potential of hydrogen and salinity values of soil samples from both the suspect and crime scene. The lithological data reveals a great correlation in the colour, grain size, grain sorting, and grain texture and grain shape of these two different soil samples. The palynological analysis yielded a recovery of palynomorphs including pollen of Elaeis guineensis, Alchornea cordifoliia, Cassia fistula, Syzygium guineense, Cyperus papyrus, Pteris species and Nephrolepis biserrata were also recovered. This reveals the potential of retrieved materials from the body of a suspect as good sources of pollen and spores. It is however important to corroborate the use of palynomorphs and sand grains with other lines of evidences in solving crime-related disputes.
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Interrelationships between Body Weight and Dimensional Shell Measurements of Giant African Land Snails (Archachatina marginata) in Calabar, Nigeria

Two hundred Archachatina marginata snails, one hundred each of A. marginata var. saturalis and A. marginata var. ovum with weights ranging from 33.10 – 349.00 g and 127.60 – 443.40 g, respectively sorted out of a base population were used for this study. Phenotypic traits measured on each of these snail varieties/strains included shell length, shell width, aperture length, aperture width, spiral length, spiral width, diagonal length, length between aperture and first spiral, number of whorls and body weight. Data collected were used to estimate phenotypic correlations between pairs of traits and to predict the relationship between body weight and other dimensional shell measurements (DSM). Results of phenotypic correlations between body weight and the DSM and between the DSM of the two A. marginata varieties showed that all the pairs of phenotypic traits investigated on A. marginata var. ovum expressed positive correlation values, while the pairs investigated on A. marginata var. saturalis showed both positive and negative correlation values. The regression estimates of parameters and coefficients of determination for the simple linear function of A. marginata var. ovum snails showed slightly high and very strong interrelationship between body weight and one phenotypic trait, while the multiple linear function for predicting body weight using four phenotypic traits showed highly significant and very strong interrelationship. In A. maginata var. saturalis snails, both the simple and multiple linear regression equations showed highly significant and very strong interrelationships between body weight and shell parameters. The range values of coefficient of determination showed that 78 to 100% of the variability in both snail strains body weights can be explained by changes in the considered dimensional shell parameters. Also, the linear functions with four and two parameters/traits best predicted the live weights of A. marginata var. saturalis and A. marginata var. ovum snails, respectively. Prediction results showed that explainable traits best predicted live weight when more than one phenotypic/shell trait were fitted into the regression functions.
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Nigeria’s E-Waste Management: Extended Producer Responsibility and Informal Sector Inclusion

This paper explores the emerging role of the private sector and public-private partnerships for e-waste management in the developing world. We use a combination of two conceptual frameworks, the triple bottom line approach and the sustainable livelihoods approach, to analyze the case study of the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) programme in Nigeria, which was launched in 2016. The sustainable livelihoods approach has been adopted in international development for over two decades, but so far it has not been applied for inclusion of informal sector workers in e-waste. Our findings illustrate how the financial and environmental bottom lines have already received considerable attention during the development of the Nigerian EPR programme, but that the social elements, in particular informal sector inclusion, have received less attention. Consequently, based on proven practices of the sustainable livelihoods approach, this paper identifies opportunities and provides recommendations as to how the international and national private sector players and government agencies involved in Nigeria’s e-waste EPR programme can establish a social engagement model to support inclusion of the informal sector. This model would not only help meet the financial and environmental bottom lines, but also address the social bottom line to improve livelihood outcomes for informal e-waste recyclers.
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Price Transmission and Signal of Cowpea across Zones and Value Chain in Niger State of Nigeria

This study investigated price transmission and signals of the three major urban cowpea markets and their respective adjunct rural market across the zones and value chain in Niger state of Nigeria using monthly time series data spanning from January 2003 to December 2016. The selected urban markets were Bida, Minna and Kontagora, and their adjunct markets were Lafene, Zungeru and Manigi, respectively.
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Sustainable Technologies for Greener Environment

Over the years, all parts of a commercial refrigerator, such as the compressor, heat exchangers, refrigerant, and packaging, have been improved considerably due to the extensive research and development efforts carried out by academia and industry.
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Editorial Board Members Related to IgE

Huaizhen Qin

Assistant Professor
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics
Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
United States

Stefan Hiendleder

Professor
JS Davies Fellow Epigenetics and Genetics
Roseworthy Campus, University of Adelaide
Australia

Mehdi Razzaghi-Abyaneh

Professor and Head
Department of Mycology
Pasteur Institute of Iran
Iran

Alfred Sze-Lok Cheng

Associate Professor
School of Biomedical Sciences
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Jimmy SO

Associate Professor
Department of Surgery
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
National University Health System
Singapore

Charles Wang

Professor
Director Center for Genomics
School of Medicine
Loma Linda University
United States

SONAL GUPTA

Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
United States

Anuradha Ratna

Department of Medicine
University of Massachusetts Medical School
USA

Andreu Palou

Professor
Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Nutrition and Biotechnology
University of the Balearic Islands
Spain

Jason W. Locasale

Assistant Professor
Division of Nutritional Sciences
Cornell University
United States
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