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Articles Related to Immunohistochemical

A Case of Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Mesorectum: Usefulness of Immunohistochemical Staining for a Differential Diagnosis from a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are similar morphologically and on imaging studies. We report a case of a patient with a giant pelvic tumor, which was difficult to be diagnosed. A 71-year-old male presented to our hospital with a complaint of urinary retention. A radiological examination showed a giant pelvic tumor mass, which ventrally compressed the urinary bladder and rectum, and was supplied by vascular flow from the right internal iliac artery. The resected specimen was 15 × 10 cm, elastic soft, and solid pale yellow in color. Because the tumor was histologically composed of spindle-shaped cells and was CD34 positive, cytokeratin negative, epithelial membrane antigens negative and KIT negative, we first thought the tumor was a KIT-negative GIST.
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Sudden Death Due to Sarcoma: An Unusual Case and Literature Review

Sudden death has varied causes, and autopsy is usually required to determine cause of death. Sarcoma involvement is very infrequent, and detailed pathological evaluation is needed for correct diagnosis.
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Hypoglossal Schwannoma: A Rare Case Report

Hypoglossal schwannomas are rare cranial base neoplasm arising from schwann cells of the XIIth cranial nerve. We report a case of 45 year old lady with history of headache for 2 years and difficulty in swallowing for 1 year. On evaluation, she was found to have left hypoglossal paresis, atrophy of tongue muscles on left side and a smooth oropharyngeal bulge on left side.
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Histological and Immunohistochemical Study on the Toxic Effects of Anthracene on the lung and liver of Adult Male Albino Rats and the Possible Protective Role of Ocimum gratissimum Extract

Anthracene is the simplest tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. It has been identified in surface and drinking water, ambient air; exhaust emissions, smoke of cigarettes and cigars and in smoked foods and edible aquatic organisms. It is primarily used as an intermediate in the production of dyes.
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Duodenal Contents Reflux can Induce Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma as Well as Adenocarcinoma

Esophageal carcinoma is the eighth most common cancer, and the sixth most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Esophageal carcinomas in developing nations account for more than 80% of the total cases and deaths. Esophageal cancer can arise as esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) or esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), which have distinct etiological and pathological characteristics. ESCC is the most common histological type of esophageal cancer in the Eastern world, and its incidence remains stable. In contrast, the epidemiology of esophageal cancer in developed nations has dramatically changed over the past 40 years. Forty years ago, ESCC accounted for more than 90% of esophageal cancer cases in the United States. However, adenocarcinoma has now become the leading type of esophageal cancer in the United States, representing 80% of cases.
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Gastric Type Adenocarcinoma with Fundic Gland Differentiation in the Duodenum Resected by ESD (Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection)

Gastric type adenocarcinoma with fundic gland differentiation (GA-FG) has been reported as a new, rare, chief cell differentiation composed carcinoma. Clinicopathologically, it exists on the gastric cardia/fundus, with low proliferative activity and low-grade malignancy. Until now, there has been no report of this GA-FG type cancer in the duodenum.
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