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Articles Related to Intensive care unit

Profile Clinical, Epidemiological of Patients Subject to Sedestation in Intensive Care Unit

The sedestation is defined as an act of sitting is a useful therapy for physiotherapy, have reported pulmonary effects ranging from increased lung compliance to improvement in oxygenation. There is lack of this study as a single therapy in critically ill patients, showing still not well defined.
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Pulmonary Nocardiosis: A Rare Diagnosis in an Intensive Care Unit

Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic bacterial infection that is typically acquired through inhalation and usually presents with pulmonary, central nervous system, and cutaneous manifestations. In critically ill patients, Nocardiosis has an unusually high morbidity and mortality.
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Quality of Life after Accidental Major Vascular Injury and Prolonged ICU Stay - A Case Report

Survival or mortality rate is a reasonable choice of an outcome measure for critically ill patients in intensive care unit (ICU). But it is also important to assess the impact of critical illness and peri-operative complications on health status and quality of life (QoL) after hospital discharge. The QLQ-C30 is a 30-item cancer-specific questionnaire that incorporates five functioning scales (physical, role, cognitive, emotional, and social), eight symptoms scales, perceived financial impact of the disease and a global scale [1-5].
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Descriptive Study of Exposure to Inhalation Zanamivir and Pregnancy-Related Outcomes

The Health Improvement Network (THIN) provided data from UK General Practitioners (GPs) for 144 pregnant women who were prescribed zanamivir and 144 age- and date-matched untreated comparators with no recorded diagnosis of influenza. Groups were assessed for baseline characteristics, treatment-emergent diagnoses in the mother, pregnancy outcomes and congenital malformations diagnosed in the offspring within 28 days of birth.
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Procalcitonin versus C-Reactive Protein in Neonatal Sepsis

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in febrile children younger than 3 months, with reported rates ranging from 5% to 20% depending on different series. Neonates and infants up to age 2 months who have pyelonephritis usually do not have symptoms localized to the urinary tract.
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Editorial Board Members Related to Intensive care unit

MARCO CARUSELLI

Pediatric Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit
La Timone Children’s Hospital
France

ZAHID AKHTAR RAO

Associate Professor
Department of Anesthesiology, Pain and Intensive care
Bahria University Medical & Dental College
Pakistan

Theresa Loomis

Director
M.S.Nutrition and Dietetics Program
State University of New York
USA

C spencer yost

Professor of Anesthesia
UCSF School of Medicine
USA
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