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Complex Traumatic Facial Degloving Injury

By definition, degloving is detachment of skin and subcutaneous tissue, most often affecting the limbs and extremities and occasionally the scalp. Degloving generally occurs from high-energy trauma. This paper describes an extreme case of traumatic facial degloving injury. This is an extremely rare condition, as the patient survived despite the risk of imminent death. This case report addresses the decisions made regarding the emergency management, prevention of necrosis and infection by surgical debridement and timely repair of the vital soft tissue structures that guided the management.
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Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon Mimicking an Abdominal Wall Cellulitis

Cutaneous metastases from abdominal malignancies are rare and have been reported in less than 5% of patients [1]. Furthermore, metastases in patients suffering from colorectal neoplasia are even rarer entity. Tan et al, among 2538 of the new cases of colorectal cancer over the period of 6 years, reported only 3 cases (0.1%) with cutaneous deposits [1]. Presentation varies from cutaneous or subcutaneous small nodules, rash or large fungating lesions [1-4]. Inevitably, their presence implies the disease progression, and poor prognosis with the reported survival between 1 to 34 months [2,3,5].
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Microfilaria Causing Bone Marrow Failure

It is common to detect microfilariae in various cytological preparations, however there are very few case reports describing microfilariae in bone marrow aspirates. It is rarer to get bone marrow failure secondary to microfilaria in bone marrow. We report here a patient from Bihar, presented to us with prolonged fever and pancytopenia, bone marrow aspirate showed microfilaria. Treatment with DEC and albendazole resulted in prompt recovery.
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Left Ventricular Mural Thrombus Treated With Dabigatran

Novel oral anticoagulants may be effective and safe alternatives to conventional treatment for left ventricular (LV) mural thrombus. A case of left ventricular mural thrombus successfully treated with dabigatran etixelate is described, and the rationale for undertaking further systematic evaluation of novel anticoagulants for this indication discussed.
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An Interesting Coexistence of a Classical-Nodular and an Adenoid-Ulcerous Basal Cell Carcinoma in the Same Anatomic Location

Basal cell carcinoma is the most frequent malignant tumor of the skin, and the most common carcinoma found in some countries. The main clinical subtypes of BCC are nodular, superficial, pigmented and morpheaform. The majority of the lesions appear on the head and neck, with a particular predilection on the upper central part of the face.
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Feasibility Analysis of Autogenous Tooth-based Bone Graft Material after Guided Bone Regeneration Technique

We set out to determine the possibility of radiographically evaluating the degree of marginal bone loss in humans after functional loading of implants at sites of guided bone regeneration (GBR) with autogenous tooth-based bone graft (ATBBG) material (AutoBT®, Korea Tooth Bank, Seoul, Korea).
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Giant Mesenteric Cyst - Cause of Abdominal Distension Managed with Laparotomy- A Case Report

This case report describes the diagnosis and management of a large mesenteric cyst in a 55 year old lady who presented with abdominal distension & with mass in the left upper quadrant. Mesenteric cysts are rare, benign, abdominal tumors to which <1000 cases have been reported in the literature.
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Unusual Presentation of CML in Pregnancy

Leukemia during pregnancy is rare, posing a complex series of questions, including appropriate therapy and maternalcounseling. Management of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) during pregnancy is limited.
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Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, A Reemerging Disease in Arizona and Sonora- Case Study

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Rickettsia Rickettsii (RMSF) is a reoccurring disease in Arizona and Sonora and a public health problem due to the high risk medical complications it provokes. In the region it is transmitted by the bite of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick, found in dogs. This tick transmits Rickettsia rickettsii bacteria.
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Clinical Characteristics of Metastatic Gastric Tumors: A Report of 8 Cases in a Single Hospital

Metastatic gastric tumors (MGTs) mean the tumor cells that attack the stomach and grow there through blood vessel, lymph vessel, and other pathway, consistent with the primary tumor in phenotype, which are clinically uncommon, and information on MGTs is generally limited to single case reports. Here we present a clinical series of 8 cases with MGTs, in attention to discuss the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment, and prognosis of MGTs.
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Juvenile Ossifying Fibroma - WHO Type

Juvenile ossifying fibroma is an uncommon clinical entity, its aggressive local behaviour and high recurrence rate mean that it is important to make an early diagnosis, apply the appropriate treatment and, especially, follow the patient up over the long term. In the current article we report a case of juvenile ossifying fibroma-WHO type in 12yr old patient which was clinical and histopathologically challenging as it was asymptomatic and at an unusual location.
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Prostate Cancer – Double Vision but Solitary Lesion

A 53 year old man with a background of castrate-sensitive prostate cancer on intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) presented with right sixth nerve palsy secondary to a solitary right petroclival lesion involving adjacent dura and bone. The clinical and imaging characteristics of the lesion were consistent with a number of differential diagnoses (including metastatic prostate cancer, meningioma and chondrosarcoma).
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Ascending Aortic B-Cell Lymphoma Masquerading as Intramural Hematoma: A Case Report

We report the case of a 74 year old female who presented with imaging concerning for an intramural hematoma of the ascending aorta. Despite multiple imaging modalities consistent with intramural hematoma, operative findings confirmed a peri-aortic lymphoma or what was once lymphoma.
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Olfactory Neuroblastoma (Esthesioneuroblastoma) following Retro-Orbital Irradiation for Graves’ Ophthalmopathy

We describe a case of radiation-induced olfactory neuroblastoma in a patient with a history of radiation for Graves’ ophthalmopathy. We also reviewed the literature and found four other cases of radiation-induced olfactory neuroblastoma reported since 2000, suggesting prior radiotherapy as one risk factor for this disease.
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Hepatic Angiosarcoma, going but not gone. Lessons from a single centre experience

Hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare tumour that is often difficult to diagnose. Historically, most cases of hepatic angiosarcoma were seen in the setting of industrial epidemics caused by exposure of workers to toxins such as vinyl chloride. Cases associated with recognised exposure to carcinogens have fortunately been extremely rare for the last three or more decades.
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