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Articles Related to Laparoscopic

Application of the Posterior Approach Technique in Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy for Cervical Cancer

The aim of this study was to compare and determine the feasibility, surgical outcomes, intraoperative and postoperative complications of the use of the posterior approach technique in the laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) to the conventional laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in patients with cervical cancer.
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Comparison of Outcomes Following Revisional Laparoscopic Gastric Band, Sleeve Gastrectomy and Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass

The number of bariatric procedures being performed worldwide has increased markedly over the past two decades and this has led to revisional bariatric surgery being increasingly performed.
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Isolated In-Situ Axial Hepatic Mal-Rotations: Implication on Laparoscopic; Surgical Anatomy and Practice

Three dimensional anatomy and congenital anomalies are crucial determining the trocar positions and the optimal site view for any laparoscopic procedure. Such critical issue mandates preoperative diagnosis of topographic anatomical variations. Clinical reporting on congenital foregut anomalies does not include yet variation in liver rotation. This research is documenting such unrevealed anomaly and stressing on its implication in the field of contemporary laparoscopic surgery.
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Ectopic Liver Found on Gall Bladder Wall during Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Ectopic liver tissue is an uncommon finding and may be found in multiple abdominal sites, most commonly on the gall bladder. It is usually asymptomatic and is discovered incidentally during cholecystectomy, but there are potential complications. We present a case of an ectopic liver seen on the gallbladder serosa during laparoscopic cholecystectomy being performed for symptomatic cholelithiasis, and briefly review the literature.
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Is an IOC Still Necessary during Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy?

Routine intraoperative cholangiogram (IOC) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) helps to confirm biliary anatomy and reduce bile leaks. It also allows identification of common bile duct stones intraoperatively which in selected patients can be cleared transcystically in the same procedure which is much less morbid than through post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Despite this, some surgeons only selectively perform IOC or forgot it all together.
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Patient Perceptions of Robotic Surgery for Benign Gynecologic Disease

Studies comparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) and conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) suggest that the two approaches have similar outcomes. However, RALS leads to higher cost and longer operative time. We sought to investigate patient perceptions of RALS for benign gynecologic pathology.
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Inguinal Hernia. A Review

Inguinal hernia is a common surgical problem, but it can present a surgical dilemma for the skilled surgeon when it exhibits some unusual contents.
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Anti-GnRH Receptor Monoclonal Antibodies, First-In-Class GnRH Analog

A monoclonal antibody (Mab) designated as GHR106 was generated against the extracellular domain (N1-29 synthetic peptide) of human gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor. It is a first-in-class GnRH analog and can serve as a drug candidate for potential applications in the treatment of human cancers and/or fertility regulations.
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A Laparoscopic Assisted Minilaparotomy Hysterectomy approach for Very Large Fibroid Uteri of more than 1000 grams – A Preliminary Study

Minilaparotomy has been used for tubal sterilization for decades. It became a new surgical idea described by some who performed minilaparotomy hysterectomy and achieved outcomes that were less invasive than those of traditional open laparotomy. Pelosi and Pelosi 2004 reported a minilaparotomy procedure in patients in whom vaginal hysterectomy was considered contraindicated. Their procedure offered a safe alternative with minimal access and good outcome.
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Extensive Worm Infestation: A Case Report

Ascariasis is the most common helminthic infection in the world and is seen mostly in the developing countries of Asia. We report a case of heavy worm infestation in a 2-year-old child who presented with worms in small bowel, common bile duct and liver with abscesses. He was managed conservatively and recovered well without any sequalae.
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Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon Mimicking an Abdominal Wall Cellulitis

Cutaneous metastases from abdominal malignancies are rare and have been reported in less than 5% of patients [1]. Furthermore, metastases in patients suffering from colorectal neoplasia are even rarer entity. Tan et al, among 2538 of the new cases of colorectal cancer over the period of 6 years, reported only 3 cases (0.1%) with cutaneous deposits [1]. Presentation varies from cutaneous or subcutaneous small nodules, rash or large fungating lesions [1-4]. Inevitably, their presence implies the disease progression, and poor prognosis with the reported survival between 1 to 34 months [2,3,5].
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Giant Mesenteric Cyst - Cause of Abdominal Distension Managed with Laparotomy- A Case Report

This case report describes the diagnosis and management of a large mesenteric cyst in a 55 year old lady who presented with abdominal distension & with mass in the left upper quadrant. Mesenteric cysts are rare, benign, abdominal tumors to which <1000 cases have been reported in the literature.
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Hepatic Angiosarcoma, going but not gone. Lessons from a single centre experience

Hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare tumour that is often difficult to diagnose. Historically, most cases of hepatic angiosarcoma were seen in the setting of industrial epidemics caused by exposure of workers to toxins such as vinyl chloride. Cases associated with recognised exposure to carcinogens have fortunately been extremely rare for the last three or more decades.
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Editorial Board Members Related to Laparoscopic

MALCOLM KENNETH ROBINSON

Assistant Professor
Department of Surgery
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Harvard Medical School
United States

Pankaj Srivastava

VATS Surgeon
Om Surgical Center & Maternity Home
Varanasi
India

Mohd Shahbaaz khan

Assistant Consultant Cardiac Surgeon
King Salman Heart Centre
King Fahad Medical City
Riyadh, kindom of Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia

IBRAHIM ANWAR AHMED ABDELAZIM

Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Ain Shams University
Egypt

Jonathan Todd Carter

Associate Professor
Department of Surgery
University of California
United States

MICHAEL L. GALLOWAY

Associate Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Wright State University
United States

JACQUES MARESCAUX

Professor
Department of Surgery
Research Institute Against Digestive Cancer
France

Carmelo Romeo

Pediatric Surgeon
Department of Pediatric, Gynecological, Microbiological and Biomedical Sceinces
University of Messina
Italy

M. BRIGID HOLLORAN-SCHWARTZ

Professor
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health
Saint Louis University School of Medicine
United States

Peter Schemmer

Professor
Department of General -, Visceral- and Transplant Surgery
University Hospital of Heidelberg
Germany
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