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Articles Related to Schwannoma

Subacute Facial Nerve Paralysis Following Cyberknife Treatment for Vestibular Schwannoma

Facial nerve paralysis may occur along the natural progression of an untreated vestibular schwannoma, as a surgical complication following vestibular schwannoma resection, or as a late sequela of stereotactic radiation. However, facial paralysis occurring as a subacute complication of CyberKnife (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) stereotactic radiation has not previously been reported. A 47-year-old male presented with a right vestibular schwannoma measuring 3.1 cm in greatest dimension with House-Brackmann grade I/VI facial function and American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery class a hearing. After deferring surgery, he elected to undergo CyberKnife stereotactic radiation to a total dose of 18 Gy in three stages.
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A Case of Late-Onset Neurofibromatosis Speculated as Type 7

A 65-year-old woman developed freckling on her skin from axillary to inguinal regions at age 40. At age 55 and 63, she had respectively, a subcutaneous tumor from her right buttock and a left acoustic tumor removed, in both cases, histopathological analyses diagnosed a schwannoma. At age 65, she was admitted to our hospital for a detailed examination of an abdominal mass previously detected by MRI.
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Schwannoma Palate in Children: Rare Case

Schwannoma is a benign tumor that originates from the presence of Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves. They are usually asymptomatic, do not recur, and malignant transformation is rare.
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Hypoglossal Schwannoma: A Rare Case Report

Hypoglossal schwannomas are rare cranial base neoplasm arising from schwann cells of the XIIth cranial nerve. We report a case of 45 year old lady with history of headache for 2 years and difficulty in swallowing for 1 year. On evaluation, she was found to have left hypoglossal paresis, atrophy of tongue muscles on left side and a smooth oropharyngeal bulge on left side.
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Jugular Foramen Schwannoma Revealed By Unilateral Deafness

Jugular foramen schwannomas arising from cranial nerves IX, X, and XI are uncommon pathological conditions, slowly growing benign tumors that constitute approximately 2.9 to 4% of all intracranial schwannomas. Jugular foramen schwannomas represent 10-30% of all tumors observed around the jugular foramen.
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