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Articles Related to disease

Assessment of the Efficacy, Safety and Cost-Effectiveness of Micafungin Compared to Caspofungin and Low Dose Liposomal Amphotericin B for the Treatment of Candidaemia and Clinically Diagnosed Invasive Candidiasis: A Retrospective Audit

Despite several studies having highlighted that candidaemia and invasive fungal disease (IFD) are associated with high mortality and increased costs, there are currently few published studies which provide an insight into real-life practice of invasive candidal diseases. In a medium-sized district general hospital in the UK we sought to compare the efficacy, safety and treatment cost of micafungin versus caspofungin and low dose of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) 1mg/kg/day for the treatment of confirmed candidaemia or clinically diagnosed invasive fungal disease (CDIFD). In the present retrospective audit, a total of 126 patients with candidaemia or CDIFD were reviewed from hospital records and 94 were included in our audit.
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Retrospective Analysis of 185 Occurrences of Clinical Neurological Signs in 181 South American Camelids

Medical records of each occurrence of neurologic signs in 181 South American Camelids admitted on 185 occasions (90 alpacas and 95 llamas) were evaluated. Age ranged from 0 days to 20 years, but 70.5% of cases were ≥ 1 year old. Specific clinical diagnosis was achieved by cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF), radiographs, computed tomography, laboratory testing, or necropsy in 74% of cases. 54% of cases survived; 46% of cases died or were euthanized. The most common diagnosis (31%) was parasitic myelopathy/encephalopathy (PME). CSF eosinophilia ≥10% was found in 85% of parasitic spinal migrations but only in 55% of intracranial migrations, and 73% had increased protein in CSF. There was a seasonal bias for PME with 79% of cases occurring between October and March. Survival of PME cases was 77% for spinal migration but only 7% when intracranial migration occurred. The most common diagnoses, excluding PME, were infectious disease (15%) and trauma (12%). Most trauma cases involved the cervical spine of which 50% survived.
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Relationship of YWHAH Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Markers of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Severity

Introduction: Serum 14-3-3 eta provides diagnostic and prognostic information in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). It is coded by the YWHAH gene with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. It was hypothesized that 6 previously described YWHAH SNPs might relate to markers of RA disease severity such as seropositivity or erosive changes. Association study performed at an academic hospital Rheumatology Clinic. Subjects studied were 18 years of age or older with RA. TaqMan analysis screened for YWHAH SNPs rs2246704, rs2853884, rs3747158, rs4820059, rs7291050, rs933226. Primary endpoint was presence of at least one copy of the YWHAH SNPs with the markers of RA disease severity.
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Does the Level of Chlamydia Serology Titre Correlate to the Degree of Tubal Disease at Laparoscopy? A Retrospective Controlled Study

In order to detect if there is any correlation between the level of total and specific Chlamydia serology titre and the degree of tubal disease at laparoscopy in sub fertile women and to compare the results with a control group. A retrospective controlled clinical study was conducted in a hospital setting (both inpatient and outpatient clinic). A total of hundred and twenty two sub fertile women who underwent laparoscopy/tubal surgery in the period between January 2011-January 2014 were included. This included 40 women with positive Chlamydia Trachomatis specific titre (group 1), 40 with positive Chlamydia serology total titre only (group 2) and 42 women with negative Chlamydia serology titre (control group). Chlamydia serology titre was measured by ELISA. The differentiated Chlamydia specific titres were measured using Microscopic Immunofluorescence Assay (MIF) to determine the immunity status. The Chlamydia Trachomatis IgG titres were classified for the purpose of the study into normal (<1/16), Mild (1/16), Moderate (1/32), and severe (>=1/64). Laparoscopic grading of tubal disease was performed into grades 1-3 according to the severity of the tubal damage which was compared to the Chlamydia titre. Pearson`s correlation test was used as a descriptive measure.
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United States Air Force Academy: Identifying Areas at Risk for the Persistence of Plague using the Bioagent Transport and Environmental Modeling System (BioTEMS)

Introduction: Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, has caused major pandemics in human history and continues to be both a natural and bioterrorist threat to human populations. Plague exists in nature in either an epidemic or enzootic state. Geographic models of the epidemic state have primarily been developed using flea and reservoir species, however little is known of the enzootic state and potential cryptic reservoir species and few endemic models have been produced.
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Electrocardiographic Abnormalities in the Elderly: A Study in a Large Database of Primary Care Patients

Ageing is associated with increasing prevalence of chronic and degenerative disease and changes in cardiovascular structure, which may be associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities. Our aim is to assess the prevalence of electrocardiographic abnormalities in elderly primary care patients.
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Double Stroke and Double Malignancy: A Case Report

Stroke associated with malignancy is rapidly increasing. Lesion types mainly resemble cardio embolic multiple ischemic lesions. We present a rare stroke patient with both ischemic and hemorrhagic lesions simultaneously. The etiology of stroke was found to be due to lung cancer and essential thrombocytosis. Differential diagnosis in this case can help for further investigation of strokes with malignancy.
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Changes in Several Disease Parameters Including Abzymes and Hematopoietic Progenitor Colony Formation in Brain Inflammation and Demyelination

Demyelination induced by cuprizone-is a widely used experimental model to analyze processes of re- and demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we used C57BL/6 mice; a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mimicking important aspects of human multiple sclerosis, to evaluate effects of cuprizone-dependent demyelination on different parameters associated with autoimmune inflammation. The treatment of mice with cuprizone leads to a significant decrease of several indexes characterizing spontaneous and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55)
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Evaluation of Apolipoprotein E Fragmentation as a Biomarker for Alzheimer’s Disease

Recent studies have supported a role for the proteolytic cleavage of apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) as a potential mechanism for the enhanced dementia risk associated with Alzheimer’s disease. To determine whether APOE4 fragmentation is correlated with AD, ELISA assays were performed with cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma samples utilizing an antibody that specifically detects a 17 kDa amino-terminal fragment (p17) of APOE (nApoECF antibody). In CSF samples, levels of APOE fragmentation were minimal in both neuropathological normals (NPNs) and AD cases and there were no significant differences between the two cohorts across APOE genotypes.
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Metabolic Syndrome in Indigenous Amerindian Women in Suriname; Less on Waist and More on Weight?

The indigenous Amerindian populations living in the southern interior part of Suriname have to date largely maintained their traditional hunter-gatherer life-style. In this study we compared the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MeTS) and its component risk factors between indigenous Amerindian women of the interior of Suriname, with indigenous Amerindian women living in the coastal-rural areas who have a more urbanized lifestyle. We focused on women since the Suriname Health study showed that Indigenous women had the second highest MeTS prevalence nationwide.
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Detection of Anti-Trypanosoma Cruzi Antibodies among Donors at A Blood Bank from Southern Mexico, Using an Iron Superoxide Dismutase Excreted (Fe-Sode) as Antigen

Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease in humans, is a widely spread protozoan in Latin America. Chronically infected people are asymptomatic during an indeterminate stage but can represent a significant risk of transmission due to blood donations and organ transplants. Blood transfusion is recognized as the second most important path for transmitting of Chagas disease
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Screening and Basic Workup of a Patient with Peripheral Vascular Disease – A Primer of Physicians

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a prevalent condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality in a variety of patient populations.
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The Importance of Brain MRI in the Diagnosis of Marchiafava-Bignami Disease

Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a neurological disorder that has been found to be associated with chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. We report a 45 year old man, chronic alcoholic that developed discouragement for activities involving daily living, changes in retrograde memory in addition to mutism and gait instability. Brain MRI showed central atrophy of the corpus callosum(CC), hypointensity(necrosis) and ventricular dilation(white matter and subcortical region involvement).
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Factors associated with obesity among Saudi women of reproductive age in Jeddah City

Previous studies have shown that women who are overweight or obese are at risk for adverse reproductive outcomes, including infertility, gestational diabetes, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. However, information surrounding the risk factors for obesity among Saudi women of reproductive age is deficient due to the limited number of studies that assessed obesity prevalence among them.
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Dental Implant Complications –Systemic Diseases- PART-I

Although dental implants have been a successful option for replacement of lost dentition for nearly five decades, their use in the medical and dental treatment plan is still in its youth. Literature on the medical implications of dental implants is surprisingly sparse, with a need for organization. This review is an attempt to begin the process of documenting the science behind this complex, yet critical topic.
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Electronic-nose Applications in Forensic Science and for Analysis of Volatile Biomarkers in the Human Breath

The application of electronic-nose (E-nose) technologies in forensic science is a recent new development following a long history of progress in the development of diverse applications in the related biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. Data from forensic analyses must satisfy the needs and requirements of both the scientific and legal communities. The type of data collected from electronic-nose devices provides a means of identifying specific types of information about the chemical nature of evidentiary objects and samples under investigation using aroma signature profiles of complex gaseous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from manufactured products and parts of the human body. E-nose analyses also provide useful qualitative information about the physicochemical characteristics and metabolic conditions of human subjects without the need for time-consuming analyses to identify all chemical components in human-derived volatile mixtures.
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Editorial Board Members Related to disease

Yue Chen

Assistant Professor
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics,
University of Minnesota
United States

Sameh S.M. Soliman

Assistant Professor
Department of Medicinal Chemistry
College of pharmacy
University of Sharjah

Marc Poirot

Research Director at INSERM
Cancer Research Center of Toulouse
University of Toulouse

Konstantin N Konstantinov

Department of Internal Medicine
University of New Mexico
United States

Arunima Mukhopadhyay

Research assistant
Paul O'Gorman Leukaemia Research Centre
University of Glasgow
United Kingdom


Department of Microbiology
Pontificia Universidad Javeriana


Associate Professor
Department of Paediatrics
University of Athens Medical School

Judyth L. Twigg

Department of Political Science
Virginia Commonwealth University
United States

J Vernon Odom

Department of Ophthalmology
West Virginia University
United States

Mohemid Al-Jebouri

Department of Microbiology
University of Tikrit
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