Top Links

Articles Related to drug delivery systems

An Introduction to the Approaches of Novel Drug Delivery Systems for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

The currently available anti HIV agents have several drawbacks such as short half life, low bioavailability, poor CNS penetration and retention, hepatic first pass metabolism, undesirable side effects and frequent dosing regimen.
View complete article: PDF  |  Full-text

A New Bi-Functional Derivative of Polyethylene Glycol as Molecular Carrier for Eugenol and Ibuprofen

Eugenol (EU) and ibuprofene (IBU) were covalently bound to a bi-functionalized PEG, used as molecular carrier of drugs and the release kinetics of the two bioactive molecules was studied in vitro in buffer solution at pH 7.4, in simulated gastric fluid and in mouse plasma.
View complete article: PDF  |  Full-text

Nanotechnology Approaches for Antiretroviral Drugs Delivery

The development of effective drug delivery approaches for the treatment of AIDS and HIV infection is a global challenge. The advent of multidrug, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), have increased the life span of HIV-infected patients.
View complete article: PDF  |  Full-text

Review on Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems

Recently, transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) has become a more and more important approach to administering drugs. Based on its advantages, which are not achievable by other modes of administration, many researchers are dedicated to the study of it, and have made great progress. Although the skin offers a painless interface for systemic drug delivery, it also presents limitations which are mainly caused by the stratum corneum.
View complete article: PDF  |  Full-text

Perspectives and Potential Applications of Ruthenium-Based Nanocarriers for Cancer Therapy

Cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease characterised by continuous uncontrolled growth and expansion of abnormal cells. In general, in tumor cells the signalling pathways regulating cellular processes, as cell growth and division and cell to cellcommunication result strongly altered.
View complete article: PDF  |  Full-text  | Digital
 
 

Biocompatible Polymers and Processing Techniques in Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering

In recent years many progress has been achieved in the biomedical and biopharmaceutical fields particularly in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. This has been possible thanks to the increased expertise in polymers chemistry as well as the advent of innovative techniques of materials manipulation that have lead to the production of new “smart” polymeric devices with peculiar propertiesable to selectively reach almost all areas of the human body, in the case of drug delivery systems, or to reduce the chemical-physical gap between human tissues and synthetic devices, in the case of tissue engineering.
View complete article: PDF  |  Full-text  | Digital
 
 


Editorial Board Members Related to drug delivery systems

Remigius U Agu

Associate Professor
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Kentucky
United States

ALAA EL-DEEN BAKRY YASSIN

Associate Professor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences
Saudi Arabia

Martin Michaelis

Professor
Department of Cell Biology
University of Kent
United Kingdom

Natasa Skalko-Basnet

Professor
Department of Pharmacy
University of Tromso
Norway

NORMA RANGEL

Professor Research
Division of Graduate Studies and Research
Institute of Technology Aguascalientes (ITA)
Technological Institute of Aguascalientes (ITA)
Mexico

Khalid M. El-Say

Associate professor
Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial pharmacy
King Abdulaziz University
Saudi Arabia

FRANCISCO FERNANDEZ CAMPOS

Professor Adjuant
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology
University of Barcelona
Spain

BADER MUBARAK W. AL-JAEID

Faculty of Pharmacy
King Abdulaziz University
Saudi Arabia

Ahmed S. Zidan

Associate Professor
Department of Pharmaceutics and industrial pharmacy
Zagazig University
Egypt

Scott Asbill

Professor
Department of pharmaceutics
Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy
United States
Submit Manuscript