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Articles Related to mastitis

Prevalence of Mastitis and Associated risk factors in Jimma Town Dairy Farms, Western Ethiopia

Across sectional study of epidemiological risk factors and associated bacterial pathogens was conducted on 216 lactating dairy cows in jimma town from Oct. 2016 to April 2017 to determine the overall prevalence rate, associated bacterial pathogens and to assess effect of risk factors on prevalence of mastitis. Upon physical examination of udder and teats the prevalence of clinical mastitis was 2.3% at cow level and 0.96% at quarter level. Using the California mastitis test (CMT) for detection of sub clinical mastitis, the prevalence of sub clinical mastitis at cow level and quarter level was 60.65 and 38.4% respectively. The overall prevalence of mastitis was 62.96. Out of 323 (38.4%) CMT positive quarters with evidence of sub clinical mastitis, the quarter infection rate for the right rare quarter was highest (41.3%) followed by left rear (38.8%), right and left front (each 36.7%). Up on microbiological examination of milk samples for both clinical and subclinical quarters, out of a total of 331 cultured, 271(81.9%) yielded bacteria whereas 60(18.1%) yielded no bacteria. A total of 263 bacterial pathogens were isolated whereas 8 were mixed infections with more than two different colonies. The main bacterial pathogens isolated were coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) (26.6 %), Staphylococcus aureus (24.7%), Escherichia coli (13.31%), Streptococcus species (9.13%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.8%). Other bacteria isolated with low isolation rate were micrococcus species (3.04%), Corynebacterium species (3.4%), Actinomyces pyogenes (3.8%), Bacillus species (3.42%) and other gram negative rods (3.8%). Host factors such as breed, age parity and lactation stage had significant effect on the prevalence of mastitis (p‹0.05). Managemental and environmental factors such as bedding, ventilation, frequency of barn cleaning, udder washing and use of communal towel had significant effect on the occurrence of mastitis (p‹0.05). Whereas milking practice, drainage had insignificant effect on the prevalence of mastitis (p›0.05).
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Jugular versus Mammary Vein Acid-Base Balance, Blood Gases, Hematobiochemical Profiles and Inflammation Biomarkers in Goats with Acute Mastitis

The objectives of this study was to investigate the acid-base balance, blood gases, hematobiochemical profiles and the inflammation biomarkers fibrinogen, serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (Hp) in the mammary and jugular veins of goats with mastitis. Blood samples were collected from the jugular and mammary veins from 26 goats with mastitis and from 10 healthy lactating goats. In diseased goats, the affected quarter had a remarkable degree of swelling, hard and sore to touch; the milk was bloody. In the jugular vein of diseased goats, the values of PCO2, PO2, base excess (BE), HCO3 and TCO2 were significantly lower than in the jugular vein of controls.
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Extraction of Mastitis Pathogen DNA from Sample Collecting Cards: Practical Consequences

Shipment of liquid milk samples for bacteriological examination is a limitation to large scale epidemiological studies. Sampling bulk tank milk (BTM) with sample collection cards (WhatmanTM FTATMMiniCard) was identified as an interesting procedure to ease sample collection and shipment.
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Outcome Following Surgical Correction of Abomasal Displacement in Lactating Dairy Cattle: A Retrospective Study of 127 Cases (1999-2010)

The objectives of this retrospective study were 1. To determine the effect of three surgical techniques (right flank omentopexy, right flank omentoabomasopexy, and left flank abomasopexy), and 2. To determine the effect of concurrent disease on return to normal milk production. Return to normal milk production occurred in 86.3% of cows diagnosed with LDA. Results suggested that cattle diagnosed with LDA corrected via right flank omentopexy or left flank abomasopexy were significantly more likely to return to normal milk production as compared to those corrected via right flank omentoabomasopexy (p<0.02). No significant difference in return to normal milk production was noted between surgical techniques for correction of RDA (p=1.000) and right abomasal volvulus (p=0.596). Concurrent disease diagnoses did not affect return to milk production. Reported complications were infrequent (n=11).
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Adults Mammary Stem Cell in Cow’s Milk: New Perspectives and Future Challenge

The discovery of the presence of stem cells and precursors with high regenerative potential in the mammary gland, hypothetically maintained throughout the course of the productive life of the dairy cow sheds an interesting perspective in the research which is interested to clarify all physiological clues and possible solutions to increase or maintain longer the potential production of dairy cows during life span of lactation.
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Editorial Board Members Related to mastitis

Jerry R. Roberson

Associate Professor
Theriogenology/Large Animal Medicine
Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine
West Indies
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