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Articles Related to obesity

Envisioning Molecular Network of Obesity by Omics Stratification

To date, Obesity is considered prime concern of public health with multi-dimensional factors engaged in metabolic discrepancy that is rooted from multifactorial causes (i.e., environmental intoxication or genetic abnormality), and the unmet landscape of health care system seeks for therapeutic or preventive measures. Compelling evidence support Omics as strategic tool of systemic biology is benefit to define wiring of molecular circuit in metabolic malfunction and evaluation of metabolic modulator such as synthetic drugs, stem cell replacement, and natural secondary metabolites from various resources.
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Overweight and Obesity among Adults Aged 18-45 Years Residing in and around Giyani Town in Mopani District of Limpopo Province, South Africa

Objective: To describe the prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults aged 18-45 years residing in and around Giyani town. Methods: This study included 100 participants recruited from a location in Greater Giyani Municipality of Mopani district, Limpopo Province, South Africa. This Municipality was purposively selected and convenience sampling was used to choose study participants. Body weight and height were measured using standard techniques. Waist circumference, systolic, diastolic, glucose, cholesterol and body fat levels were also assessed.
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Gastric Partitioning Bypass Procedure: A Novel Technique in Bariatric Surgery

The current standard of care offers surgery as the most favored treatment modality for morbidly obese patients to achieve weight loss. The currently available surgical techniques have some limitations and introduction of novel techniques is inevitable. The aim of this study is to introduce the novel gastric partitioning bypass technique and assess its effectiveness and adverse effects.Thirty individuals were randomly recruited from a population who were eligible for bariatric surgery. The subjects had a baseline visit and were followed-up after surgery assessing weight loss and adverse effects related to the surgery.The study population included 30 patients (Mean age 41±5 and 93% female). Mean BMI and excess body weight at the baseline were 49±7 kg/m² and 79±15 Kg, respectively. Median follow-up time was 36 months and 27 (90%) patients completed the study. Excess weight loss was 54.76 ± 13.76 % and 60.43 ± 14.49% after 12 and 48 months, respectively. In post-operative period Two patients (6.6%) developed surgical site infection, other complications such as bleeding or anastomotic leakage, or any complication requiring emergent surgery were not detected.
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Exercise and Eating Habits in Relation to BMI in Female College Students of Almareefa Colleges in Ad Diriyah

The benefits of exercise have been known a long time ago, physical activity is an important factor to reduce the risk of unhealthy weigh. Certain types of foods, eating habits have been linked to weight and BMI. The purpose of the study was to identify the relationship between exercise, eating habits and BMI. This was an observational descriptive cross-sectional university-based study of 100 female medical students of Almaarefa Colleges from level 3 to 8, participants were chosen randomly and questionnaires were distributed among them and anthropometric measurements were taken for BMI calculations. Out of 100 female medical students, 52% were of a normal weight category at level 5-6. Obesity was only seen among level 3-4 (12%).57% of normal weight participants don’t eat very fast. 52% of normal weight participants exercise and 35% of them exercise 3 times or more a week. No obese participants were seen in those who exercise 3 times a week or more. 60% of overweight/obese participants exercise 2 times or less a week. This study revealed a strong association between physical activity and BMI, also fast eating was found to be associated with obesity.
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The Association Between Strength, Balance and Physical Function with the Body Mass Index in Dyslipidemia

The coexistence of chronic diseases has led to greater negativity in patients than the negativity of diseases individually speaking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the body mass index on metabolic profile, isometric and isokinetic muscle strength, static and dynamic balance, and anaerobic capacity in dyslipidemia patients, as well as to emphasize what exercises should be recommended for recovering the experienced functional loss of the patients. Forty five patients (26 women, 19 men) between 40 and 75 years of age and who were newly diagnosed as dyslipidemia were enrolled into this study. The patients were divided into two groups according to their body mass indexes (BMI): group 1 (n:18) or those whose BMI was lower than 25 kg/m2, and group 2 (n:27) or those whose BMI was higher than 30 kg/m2. Biochemical blood sampling was done. The Get Up and Go, single leg stance, anaerobic capacity, and isometric as well as isokinetic muscle strength tests were performed in order to evaluate functional capacities. There were no statistically significant differences shown at gender distribution, age, or height (p>0.05) between groups. The weight and BMI’s between the groups were statistically significantly different (p<0.05). The fasting glucose levels and triglyceride levels of group 2 was statistically significantly higher than group 1 (p<0.05), whereas other biochemical parameters showed no differences (p>0.05). The static balance tests results between groups have shown no statistically significant differences (p<0.05); however the dynamic balance test results for group 2 was statistically significantly worse than those of group 1 (p<0.05). The parameters of the results of the anaerobic testing, alongside those of the isometric and isokinetic testing for group 1 patients were statistically significantly higher than those of group 2 (p<0.05). Obesity negatively affects dyslipidemic patients’ metabolic and functional capacities. An exercise program for dyslipidemic patients with a high BMI should include strengthening and balance as well as dynamic balance exercises in order to positively influence both their metabolic profiles and functional status.
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Effect of Cold Wet sheet Pack on Body Temperature among Healthy Individuals - Result of a Single Arm Study

Hydrotherapy, as the name suggests is the most ancient method of treating diseases by using water in its various forms. The use of water for therapy has been around for hundreds of years. The cold wet sheet pack is one of the common hydrotherapy techniques used for reducing body weight. There have been no documented studies conducted to scientifically evaluate this effect. This study is an attempt to examine the effect of cold wet sheet pack on body temperature. Application of cold wet sheet pack for particular duration increases the body temperature by utilization of calories thus may leads to reduction of bodyweight. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomly selected from medical students enrolled in a naturopathic programme. The participants were of both sexes aged between 18 and 25 years under normal Body mass index (18.5-25). A cold (20 oC± 1 oC) wet sheet pack has given to each of the participants for one hour duration. The outcome measures were resting blood pressure, body temperature and pulse rate. 30 Participants were successfully completed the study, all participants have shown a raise in body temperature after intervention which was statistically significant (P=0.003). There is no significant change in blood pressure and pulse rate. Also there was a week positive correlation between body mass index and body temperature. A cold wet sheet pack for one hour has shown a raise in body temperature, which indicate that the cold wet sheet pack have a role in reducing body weight by utilizing the calories. However, these observations are based on a short term single arm pre-post design on healthy students. A cold wet sheet pack has been demonstrated in this study to have a significant effect in increasing body temperature and shows perspiration by utilization of calories. Large scale randomized control trials in obese patients over a longer period are warranted to conform the results which was uncovered in this study.
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Stress-Induced Laboratory Eating Behavior in Obese and Normal-Weight Women

Inconsistent results of stress induced eating behavior in obesity have been reported. In order to describe the effect of stress on eating behavior in detail, we investigated microstructural aspects of food intake in a controlled laboratory experiment. Eating behavior of 43 obese women and 42 normal weight controls between 18 and 30 years was assessed twice (one time after participating in the Trier Social Stress Test and one time after a control session). A universal eating monitor was used to obtain cumulative intake curves with pudding as laboratory food. Compared to controls, obese showed inhibited eating behavior after stress. The results are interpreted and discussed with regard to restrained eating.
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Perceived Barriers to Maintaining Healthy Body Weight among Saudi Women of Reproductive Age in Jeddah City

Maintaining a healthy body weight is important for overall health and can help prevent and control many chronic conditions. However, the information surrounding the barriers to healthy eating (HE) and physical activity (PA) for weight maintenance among Saudi women of reproductive age is insufficient to design and develop intervention programs. To explore personal, social, and physical environmental factors that act as barriers to maintaining a healthy weight and how these barriers vary by socio-demographic and weight status. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 using a stratified two-stage cluster sampling design comprising 408 Saudi women attending 12 Jeddah Primary Health Centers (JPHCCs). Data was collected using a structured questionnaire consisting of socio-demographic factors, eating habits (EHs), PA, and perceived barriers to a maintenance of healthy weight maintenance. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) data also were obtained.
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Obesity and its Correlates among Junior High School Children in the Accra Metropolis

The prevalence of obesity is on the increase worldwide due to changes in diet and physical activity patterns. Childhood obesity is now a major public health challenge in advanced economies. Obesity in childhood tends to persist into adulthood and to predispose to non-communicable diseases. There is little data on childhood obesity and its correlates and determinants in sub-Saharan Africa. A cross-sectional study was carried out using simple random sampling technique to select 260 junior high school children aged 11-15 years from six basic schools (n=768) from three different socioeconomic (low, middle, high) areas of Accra, the capital city of Ghana.
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Relationship between Weight Pre-Pregnancy and Weight Gain during Pregnancy with Preterm Birth

Worldwide alarming increase of obesity prevalence has led the WHO to take into consideration as one of the most serious global health problems of the 21st century. 40% of women worldwide are overweight. The leading causes of obesity prevalence in women more often becaouse during pregnancy and before pregnancy they gain excess weight. The rapid increase of obesity prevalence especially among women in the World cause women begin pregnancy overweight or obese and this can cause problems about pregnancy and birth.
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Metabolic Syndrome in Indigenous Amerindian Women in Suriname; Less on Waist and More on Weight?

The indigenous Amerindian populations living in the southern interior part of Suriname have to date largely maintained their traditional hunter-gatherer life-style. In this study we compared the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MeTS) and its component risk factors between indigenous Amerindian women of the interior of Suriname, with indigenous Amerindian women living in the coastal-rural areas who have a more urbanized lifestyle. We focused on women since the Suriname Health study showed that Indigenous women had the second highest MeTS prevalence nationwide.
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Factors associated with obesity among Saudi women of reproductive age in Jeddah City

Previous studies have shown that women who are overweight or obese are at risk for adverse reproductive outcomes, including infertility, gestational diabetes, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. However, information surrounding the risk factors for obesity among Saudi women of reproductive age is deficient due to the limited number of studies that assessed obesity prevalence among them.
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Case Report: Are We Prepared to Manage Acute Abdomen in the Super-Obese Patient?

A 55 year-old man with signs and symptoms of severe sepsis was admitted to the emergency department. He is severely obese with a BMI of 80 Kg/ m2 and a medical history of hypertension and arrhythmia. The abdominal pain was non-specific and the physical examination was impaired by obesity. Ultrasonography (US) was ineffective and no computed tomography (CT) scan was available for a patient of his weight. The acute abdomen presented an inflammatory etiology. The patient underwent laparoscopy and severe cholecystitis was diagnosed and treated. The patient recovered well, and remained for 36h in the intensive care unit and 5 days in the surgical ward.
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Physical Activity and the Prevalence of General and Abdominal Obesity among Saudi Women of Reproductive Age in Jeddah City

Obesity and physical inactivity are growing problems that are associated with major health problems. However, the current information on the association between obesity and physical activity (PA) in Saudi women of reproductive age is insufficient to design and develop intervention programs. To explore the rates of two types of obesity (general and abdominal obesity) and the level of PA and to evaluate the relationship between obesity risk factors, the use of exercise equipment at home, A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 using a stratified two-stage cluster sample. The sampling weight and design effect were incorporated into the analysis. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) data were collected from all participants.and obesity measurements.
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The Effectiveness of an Activity Meter for Overweight Children and Their Caregivers in a Clinical Setting: a Pilot Study

Childhood obesity is epidemic in the United States, but low levels of physical activity and high levels of screen time are modifiable risk factors. An activity meter (AM) program, that utilizes an interactive child-focused website and measures the amount and intensity of physical activity, may promote activity and decrease BMI.The current study tests the feasibility of using an AM program with child-caregiver pairs in a primary care setting. We hypothesize that participants would rate the system as easy to use, would be motivated with their engagement in physical activity, and would continue to use and recommend to others. We hypothesize the AM system would increase children’s physical activity levels and decrease engagement in screen time over the study period. We also measure changes in participants’ body mass index (BMI).Prospective study assessing ease of use and satisfaction with the AM program post-intervention and comparing physical activity and BMI changes in children and caregivers from pre- and post-intervention over a 4-month period.
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Editorial Board Members Related to obesity

Jonathan Todd Carter

Associate Professor
Department of Surgery
University of California
United States

YUNBO LI

Professor
Department of Pharmacology
Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine
United States

Kathy K Isoldi

Assistant Professor
Department of Nutrition
Long Island University
United States

NATASHA TASEVSKA

Assistant Professor
School of Nutrition and Health Promotion
Arizona State University
United States

DONALD K. INGRAM

Adjunct Professor
Pennington Biomedical Research Center
Louisiana State University
United States

Sununta Youngwanichsetha

Assistant Professor
Faculty of Nursing
Prince of Songkla University
Thailand

Jyotsna Sharman

Assistant Professor
Department of Health and Human Performance
Radford University
United States

Chandan Saha

Associate Professor
Department of Biostatistics
School of Medicine
Indiana University
United states

Lan-Juan (Jean) Zhao

Assistant Professor
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics
Tulane University
United States

Jimmy SO

Associate Professor
Department of Surgery
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
National University Health System
Singapore
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