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Articles Related to pathogens

Bacteriology and Antibiogram of pathogens isolated from wound infections at Cheshire Hall Medical Laboratory, Turks and Caicos Islands

To identify pathogens that are frequently isolated from wound infections in the Turks and Caicos Islands and formulate antibiogram based on their patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility. Bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility data from 1343 wound swabs cultured at the Cheshire Hall Medical Laboratory between January 2013 and November 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique was used to perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing. 79.1% of the 1343 swabs cultured were positive yielding a total of 1687 bacterial isolates. Frequently isolated bacteria included Staphylococcus aureus which accounted for 27.6% of isolates, approximately a third of which were methicillin resistant, Pseudomonas spp. (12.1%), Proteus spp. (8.2%), Enterococcus spp. (7.8%), E. coli (7.2%), Streptococcus agalactiae (6.1%), Klebsiella spp. (5.5%), Acinetobacter spp. (4.3%), coagulase negative Staphyloccus (4.0%) and Enterobacter spp. (3.7%). The overall highest resistance rates were seen among tetracycline (46.3%), erythromycin (37.6%) and ceftriaxone (34.2%). Imipenem, penicillin, meropenem and vancomycin had sensitivity rates ranging from 92.3% to 99.5%. Individual resistance rates varied among isolates, some differing significantly from overall rates. When tested against antibiotics routinely used to treat Pseudomonas spp., resistance rates ranged from 1.4-55.5%.
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Prevalence of Mastitis and Associated risk factors in Jimma Town Dairy Farms, Western Ethiopia

Across sectional study of epidemiological risk factors and associated bacterial pathogens was conducted on 216 lactating dairy cows in jimma town from Oct. 2016 to April 2017 to determine the overall prevalence rate, associated bacterial pathogens and to assess effect of risk factors on prevalence of mastitis. Upon physical examination of udder and teats the prevalence of clinical mastitis was 2.3% at cow level and 0.96% at quarter level. Using the California mastitis test (CMT) for detection of sub clinical mastitis, the prevalence of sub clinical mastitis at cow level and quarter level was 60.65 and 38.4% respectively. The overall prevalence of mastitis was 62.96. Out of 323 (38.4%) CMT positive quarters with evidence of sub clinical mastitis, the quarter infection rate for the right rare quarter was highest (41.3%) followed by left rear (38.8%), right and left front (each 36.7%). Up on microbiological examination of milk samples for both clinical and subclinical quarters, out of a total of 331 cultured, 271(81.9%) yielded bacteria whereas 60(18.1%) yielded no bacteria. A total of 263 bacterial pathogens were isolated whereas 8 were mixed infections with more than two different colonies. The main bacterial pathogens isolated were coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) (26.6 %), Staphylococcus aureus (24.7%), Escherichia coli (13.31%), Streptococcus species (9.13%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.8%). Other bacteria isolated with low isolation rate were micrococcus species (3.04%), Corynebacterium species (3.4%), Actinomyces pyogenes (3.8%), Bacillus species (3.42%) and other gram negative rods (3.8%). Host factors such as breed, age parity and lactation stage had significant effect on the prevalence of mastitis (p‹0.05). Managemental and environmental factors such as bedding, ventilation, frequency of barn cleaning, udder washing and use of communal towel had significant effect on the occurrence of mastitis (p‹0.05). Whereas milking practice, drainage had insignificant effect on the prevalence of mastitis (p›0.05).
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Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) Used as a Whole Model Organism to Identify New Anti-Infectives Therapeutic Agent for MRSA Pathogens - A Review Paper

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the greatest fears with the number of serious infections on human health regarding antibiotic resistance. It causes a wide range of infections and bacteremia, ranging from inconsequential superficial skin infections, wound suppuration, even pneumonia or deep-seated tissue infections, which may lead to sepsis and fatalities.
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Antifungal Potential in Crude Extracts of Five Selected Brown Seaweeds Collected from the Western Libya Coast

The present study confirms the potential use of seaweed extracts as a source of antifungal compound and may constitute a basis for promising future applied research that could investigate the use of seaweeds.
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Extraction of Mastitis Pathogen DNA from Sample Collecting Cards: Practical Consequences

Shipment of liquid milk samples for bacteriological examination is a limitation to large scale epidemiological studies. Sampling bulk tank milk (BTM) with sample collection cards (WhatmanTM FTATMMiniCard) was identified as an interesting procedure to ease sample collection and shipment.
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Reduction of Bitterness and Enhancing Palatability of Cetirizine Oral Liquid Dosage Forms by Cyclodextrins

The aim of this manuscript is to study cyclodextrins (CDs) as a potential excipient to suppress bitterness and enhance palatability of pediatric liquid preparations for Cetirizine, an extremely bitter drug. Natural α, β and γ CDs; and β CD derivatives such as hydroxyl propyl (HP), randomly methylated (RM) and sulfobutyl ether (SBE) β-CDs were screened in different molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 for their inhibition of the extremely bitter taste of Cetirizine using the human gustatory sensation test.
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Surgical Wound Management in Dogs using an Improved Stable Chlorine Dioxide Antiseptic Solution.

Three surgical case reports are presented to demonstrate the clinical efficacy of using an improved aqueous solution of chlorine dioxide complex (160 ppm) as a topical antiseptic in the post operative management of serious wounds in dogs. In vitro studies are included to demonstrate the antiseptic properties of this new chlorine dioxide complex.
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The End of the Golden Age of Antibiotics?

The discovery of a substance with antibacterial properties was expected to permanently diminish the occurrence of bacterial infections posing a threat to health and life. Since the discovery of penicillin many new groups of antibiotics have been introduced into treatment of disease in people and animals, but their excessive and frequently unjustified use, and most importantly, incorrect dosage, have led to numerous unanticipated problems in contemporary human and veterinary medicine.
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The BMBL and Biosafety Levels

Scientists began developing and publishing a series of best practices to mitigate laboratory risks in the 1970’s. These biosafety guidelines are disseminated by the Department of Health and Human Services in the publication Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL).
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Editorial Board Members Related to pathogens

Mohamed Maarouf Ali Zeinhom

Associate Professor
Food Hygiene Department
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
Beni-Suef University
Egypt

ELENA A. USACHEVA

Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology
University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine
United States

Jeffrey E. Lee

Assistant Professor
Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology
University of Toronto
Canada

Frank Portugal

Associate Professor
Department of Biology
The Catholic University of America
United States

Mehdi Razzaghi-Abyaneh

Professor and Head
Department of Mycology
Pasteur Institute of Iran
Iran

LEONID B. MARGOLIS

Visiting Professor
Ilia University
Republic of Georgia
Georgia

Olga S. Latinovic

Assistant Professor
Institute of Human Virology
University of Maryland School of Medicine
United States

Robert R. Redfield

Professor
Department of Immunology and Microbiology
University of Maryland
United States

Murad A. Al-Holy

Associate professor
Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics
Hashemite University
Jordan

Subash Sad

Professor
Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology
University of Ottawa
Canada
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