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Articles Related to tibia

Modified and Combined Lateral and Posterolateral Approach an Alternative Treatment to Tibial Plateau Fractures

The selection of a surgical approach for the treatment of tibia plateau fractures is an important decision. Approximately 7% of all tibia plateau fractures affect the posterolateral corner. Displaced posterolateral tibia plateau fractures require anatomic articular reduction and buttress plate fixation on the posterior aspect. These aims are difficult to reach through a lateral or anterolateral approach. The standard posterolateral approach with fibula osteotomy and release of the posterolateral corner is a traumatic procedure, which includes the risk of fragment denudation. Isolated posterior approaches do not allow sufficient visual control of fracture reduction, especially if the fracture is complex. Therefore, the aim of this case report was to present a surgical approach for posterolateral tibial plateau fractures that both protects the soft tissue and allows for good visual control of fracture reduction. The approach involves a lateral arthrotomy for visualizing the joint surface and a posterolateral approach for the fracture reduction and plate fixation, which are both achieved through one posterolateral skin incision. Using this approach, we achieved reduction of the articular surface and stable fixation in patients at the final follow-up visit. No complications and no loss of reduction were observed. Additionally, the new posterolateral approach permits direct visual exposure and facilitates the application of a buttress plate. This approach does not require fibular osteotomy, and fragments of the posterolateral corner do not have to be detached from the soft tissue network.
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Epiphyseal Closure of Femur, Tibia and Fibula of the Paca (Cuniculus Paca, Linnaeus, 1766)

After capybara, paca (Cuniculus paca) is the largest rodent in the neotropical region and the body weight varies from 5 to 10 kg, and may reach up to 14 kg. They are animals that reach sexual maturity at around 10 months of age. The aim of this research is to examine, through radiography, the femur, tibia and fibula of the paca. The animals were anaesthetized for radiographic exams. At 6 months of age, the growth line of the femoral proximal epiphysis ceases to perform its functions. At 12 months of age, there is the closure of the line growth of distal femoral epiphysis. At the paca’s tibia, at 12 months old, there was the closure of the growth of the proximal epiphysis. In the distal epiphysis, the closure of the line growth also occurred at 12 months old. At the paca’s fibula, the bone activity of proximal epiphysis ceases with only 23 months old. The distal fibular epiphysis ends its development with 15 months. There are similarities and differences relative to the closure of the pacas’ epiphysis femur, tibia and fibula comparing with dogs and cats.
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Acrometastasis from a Pancreatic Primary Adenocarcinoma: A First Report in the Literature

A seventy five year male presented with acute onset right foot pain and swelling. Plain imaging revealed a lytic area in the medial and middle cuneiform bones of the right foot. Background history of resected pancreatic cancer and current presentation were consistent early diffuse disease recurrence of a pancreatic primary tumour. The presenting feature in this case was of symptomatic acrometastases, that is, metastases to the feet.
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