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Articles Related to Infection

Unexpected Improvement of Chronic Neurological Disease after Recovery from COVID-19 Infection in Four Patients

During the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians actively searched for adverse neurological complications or coagulopathyrelated strokes, but no protective effects were yet reported. We hereby describe our observations at a Geriatrics / Neurology facility on a range of neurological disorders encountered among COVID-19 patients followed for disabling neurological disease (degenerative or post traumatic dementia). We observed a very significant clinical improvement in 4 patients aged 43 to 78, who were in nursing skills home or at home and followed up for a disabling neurological disease for 2 to 5 years. They were affected by COVID-19 between March and October 2020.
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SARS-CoV-2 Breakthrough Infection Three Weeks after Second Vaccination

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants raises increasing concerns about the efficacy of currently available vaccines [1]. mRNA vaccines (BNT162b2, Pfizer-BioNTech; mRNA-1273, Moderna) are developed based on one specific part of the viral genome to elicit immune response. Therefore, they might be susceptible to immune escape mutations, such as the ones in the viral Spike protein [2].
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Does Obesity Increase the Risk of Brain Damage following COVID-19 Infection?

Neurological impairments associated with Covid-19 have been the subject of numerous investigations since the end of 2019, when the SARS-CoV-2 virus appeared and showed a staggering rise worldwide. Neuroimaging in patients infected with Covid-19 revealed the apparition of severe brain pathologies, such as acute perfusion deficits and white matter abnormalities, meningeal enhancement, basal ganglia lesions, intracranial hemorrhage, encephalitis, cerebral venous thrombosis, encephalopathy, and stroke [1,2].
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Ayurvedic Antiviral Agents: Overview of Medicinal Plants Perspective

In recent years it has been reported that many of the herbal plants contain antiviral agents which combat human disease that are caused by pathogenic viruses. The natural products which are obtained from plants as antiviral agents against viruses have gone through researches to check the efficacy and potentials of the herbal products in prevention of viral disorders.
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Reinfection in A Healthcare Worker with SARS-Cov 2 in a Hospital in North India

Here, we report a case of reinfection after a gap of 97 days in our hospital. A 26-year-old male was working as a health care worker (HCW) in the COVID Intensive Care Unit. After completing his posting of 14 days (active quarantine), he tested positive with SARS CoV-2 by Real-time PCR (RTPCR) assay on 03/05/20 during routine testing which is done to all the HCW at the end of the active quarantine period as per the hospital policy
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Inflammatory “Endotheliopathy’’ with COVID 19 Infections in Children, Unanswered Questions for Management Post Recovery

Recent studies from U.K, US and Canada have reported a unique presentation of the novel corona virus (SARS-CoV-2) in the pediatric age group. High fevers, rash, multiorgan involvement was a recurrent mode of presentation; with an overall case fatality rate in the US-Canadian PICU consortium group was reported to be approximately 4.2% [1-7]
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Simultaneous Tuberculous Infection of Lung and Allograft in Renal Transplant

Tuberculosis is common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients. In immunosuppressed patients, clinical manifestations of tuberculosis are varied and delayed diagnosis and poor clinical outcomes. Especially allograft involvement of tuberculosis can cause allograft loss. In this report, we present the case of 46-year-old man diagnosed disseminated tuberculosis involving allograft kidney successfully treated with maintenance of allograft function.
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Effect of Seed Thermotherapy to Reduce the Viral Diseases of Faba Bean (Vicia Faba L.) in the Interandean Valley of Cochabamba, Bolivia

In Bolivia, the faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is cultivated in the Andean region, Altiplano and Interandean valleys. In these valleys mediumsized and early varieties are cultivated.
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Splenic Abscesses as a Complication of Urinary Tract Infection: Case Report and Literature Review

Granular cell tumor, also known as Abrikossoff tumor, is a rare lesion that arises from the nervous system. Most of these tumors are benign and only 1-2% are malignant. Although they can be found in any part of the human body, 45-65% appears in the head and neck region, mainly in the oral cavity. Here, we report 2 cases of granular cell tumor of the tongue, diagnosed by excisional biopsy. Until the present moment, both patients remain with no recurrence.
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Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Pathogens Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Public Health Facilities in Belize

Surgical site infections are amongst the leading cause of morbidity, mortality and cost due to increased hospital stay by patients. A study was conducted to understand antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of major pathogens isolated from surgical site infections in Belize.
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Bacteriology and Antibiogram of pathogens isolated from wound infections at Cheshire Hall Medical Laboratory, Turks and Caicos Islands

To identify pathogens that are frequently isolated from wound infections in the Turks and Caicos Islands and formulate antibiogram based on their patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility. Bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility data from 1343 wound swabs cultured at the Cheshire Hall Medical Laboratory between January 2013 and November 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique was used to perform antimicrobial susceptibility testing. 79.1% of the 1343 swabs cultured were positive yielding a total of 1687 bacterial isolates. Frequently isolated bacteria included Staphylococcus aureus which accounted for 27.6% of isolates, approximately a third of which were methicillin resistant, Pseudomonas spp. (12.1%), Proteus spp. (8.2%), Enterococcus spp. (7.8%), E. coli (7.2%), Streptococcus agalactiae (6.1%), Klebsiella spp. (5.5%), Acinetobacter spp. (4.3%), coagulase negative Staphyloccus (4.0%) and Enterobacter spp. (3.7%). The overall highest resistance rates were seen among tetracycline (46.3%), erythromycin (37.6%) and ceftriaxone (34.2%). Imipenem, penicillin, meropenem and vancomycin had sensitivity rates ranging from 92.3% to 99.5%. Individual resistance rates varied among isolates, some differing significantly from overall rates. When tested against antibiotics routinely used to treat Pseudomonas spp., resistance rates ranged from 1.4-55.5%.
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Differential Expression of Proteins Associated with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection on HeLa cell lines

Treatment of Hepatitis B infection is available with the help of existing drugs but the eradication of HBV infection is still under the pipeline. The application of novel drugs and gene-based therapies for HBV infection in need of the hour, however, the lack of efficient cell culture system, animal models for viral infection and replication acts as a major obstacle for novel therapies. This not only hampers the progress of HBV research but also stress the need for effective forthcoming therapeutics for Hepatitis B infection. Proteomic studies to understand the protein ubiquitination and to find molecular markers are the effective tools to study the HBV infection, pathogenesis and its control.
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Veterinary Considerations for the Theoretical Resurrection of Extinct Species

The de-extinction of the dinosaur is a dubious possibility but its consideration brings forth some issues that are at least worthy of scientific discussion. In this review, we discuss two distinct issues that have implications for a de-extinct species such as a dinosaur: the ability, or lack thereof, to safely sedate a rare and potentially fractious animal capable of harming the veterinary staff tasked with its care; and, disease risks associated with a species that has been extinct for millions of years. To identify potential sedatives, comparative pharmacology will be needed to uncover the links between receptor pharmacology and the desired clinical outcomes of activating established alpha-2 adrenergic, opioid, and benzodiazepine receptors. Specific to disease control, it will be necessary to understand the unique susceptibility of the new species to current diseases as well as predicting their reservoir capacity for potential human and veterinary pandemic diseases. While the topics presented herein are not exhaustive, this review highlights some of the foremost research that should be conducted in order to serve the unique veterinary needs of a de-extinct species using the dinosaur as a paradigm. Addressing these issues should be considered if an intact dinosaur genome becomes available, regardless of the feasibility of dinosaur resurrection.
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Pulmonary Nocardiosis: A Rare Diagnosis in an Intensive Care Unit

Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic bacterial infection that is typically acquired through inhalation and usually presents with pulmonary, central nervous system, and cutaneous manifestations. In critically ill patients, Nocardiosis has an unusually high morbidity and mortality.
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Salmonella Contamination of Fresh Salad Produce: Prevalence, Impact and Reduction Strategies

Fresh salad produce such as lettuce and spinach are an important part of a healthy diet, but are increasingly becoming associated with infection from foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella enterica. This review examines the incidence and origins of Salmonella fresh salad leaf colonization, models the behaviour of the pathogen when within a bagged salad and considers the various infection risk reduction strategies relevant to salad growers, distributors and consumers which can be employed to improve the microbiological safety of fresh salad leaves
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Editorial Board Members Related to Infection

Bryan Krantz

Associate professor
Department of Microbial Pathogenesis
University of Maryland
United States

Jayasimha Rao

Associate Professor
Jefferson College of Health Sciences
Department of Medicine
USA

Andrew W. Taylor-Robinson

Professor of Immunology & Haematology
School of Medical & Applied Sciences
Central Queensland University
Australia

Efimia Papadopoulou-Alataki

Assistant professor
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Papageorgiou Hospital
Greece

Ziad N. AL-Dwairi

Professor
Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Implant Dentistry
Jordan University of Science and Technology
Jordan

Suresh G. Joshi

Associate Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Drexel University
United States

Matthias Clauss

Associate Professor
Department of Medicine
Indiana University
United States

ILIAS PORFYRIDIS

Respiratory Physician
Nicosia General Hospital
Cyprus

Rajiv Saini

Associate Professor
Department of Periodontology & Oral Implantology
Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences – Loni
India

Shuvra Kanti Dey

Assistant Professor
Department of Microbiology
Jahangirnagar University
Bangladesh
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