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Articles Related to Potential

Screening of Visual Pathway in Patients Suffering from Guillain Barre by Visual Evoked Potential

Aim: Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is a rare condition in which a person's immune system attacks the peripheral nerve. The visual system can also be affected in GBS patients. The aim of present work is to look for visual pathway, disturbances in these patients using visual evoked potential (VEP). Material and Methods: 10 male patients (20 eyes) diagnosed as GBS in age range of 25 to 56 years were selected for the purpose of present study. Visual evoked potential (VEP) using pattern type of stimulation was tested in total patient group using Mangoni machine. The results obtained was compared with 10 normal sex and age matched population following VEP test.
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Unveiling Natures Arsenal: Harnessing Entada africana's Methanol Bark Extract to Combat Malarial infection Through Heme Polymerase Inhibition

Plasmodium parasites, which cause malaria, continue to pose a serious threat to global health, necessitating the continuous search for novel antimalarial agents. Entada africana is a plant known for its ethnomedicinal uses in treating various ailments associated with inflammation including malaria. Due to its reported antiplasmodial potentials, we studied the effect of the methanol bark extract of the plant. HPLC chromatogram of the methanol bark extract showed the presence of eight phyto-compounds namely coumaric acid, gallic acid, catechin, ferulic acid, quercetin, apigenin, rutin, and kaemferol. Thus, the study aimed at evaluating the antiplasmodial potential of methanol bark extract of Entada africana (MBEEA) through heme polymerase inhibition via in silico approaches. The in silico studies showed favourable binding affinities and stable interactions with heme polymerase, with rutin (-9.9 kcal/mol), apigenin (-8.0 kcal/mol) and catechin (-7.8 kcal/mol) having higher binding affinities compared to the standard drug, chloroquine (-6.7 kcal/mol). Hydrogen bond analysis reveals that ferulic acid (Asp 77, Ile 73 and Ala 29) and kaemferol (Arg 40, Arg 27 and Leu 74) form three hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, compounds like coumaric acid (Ala 291 and Arg 27), gallic acid (Ala 29 and Ser 76), catechin (Arg 40 and Arg 40), and quercetin (Ser 76 and Ser 76) form two hydrogen bonds with the amino acid residues, rutin forms two hydrogen bonds with Ser 76 and Leu 74, while apigenin forms one hydrogen bond with Arg 27 when compared to the standard drug, chloroquine (-6.7 kcal/mol) which forms no hydrogen bonds with the amino acid residues. Based on their pharmacokinetic characteristics, safety profiles, and appropriate drug-like ability, seven compounds were shown to have antiplasmodial properties by computational ADMET tests
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Clodronate : A Potential DMOAD in Osteoarthtitis

Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory-degenerative joint disease that affects the osteochondral unit with the concomitant intervention of the immune system; this causes pain and progressive functional limitation. With a varied and complex etiopathogenesis, Osteoarthritis has a subtle outcome and an inexorable evolution towards joint deformity. The therapeutic approach makes use of non-pharmacological and pharmacological aids. Pharmacological therapy consists of symptomatic drugs that act on acute and especially chronic pain, in an attempt to decrease the incidence of any structural damage to the cartilage and subchondral bone. If the anti-resorptive drugs cure the subchondral-epiphyseal osteometabolic pathology, the interventions on the cartilage have not produced important and well evaluable results, even after prolonged therapies. This contribution analyzes the profile of Clodronate, used for the treatment of subchondral bone edema in Osteoarthritis, regarding its potential protective effects in cartilage, like DMOADs.
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Mattress Coil Spring Fatigue and Support: A Potential Association with Spine Stiffness and Pain

Prolong mattress use compresses the metal coil springs which may ultimately result in a compromised sleeping surface. This coil spring metal fatigue can result in spinal pain and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of metal fatigue of used mattress coil springs from the areas bearing greatest body weight versus areas subjected to little compression to ascertain the. Six weight bearing coil springs (WBS) were extracted from the center the used (range 8-10 yr.) mattresses (N=32) and six non-weight bearing coil springs (NWBS) were extracted from the head/foot are of the same mattresses. To determine spring weakness a special frame and platform was constructed to compare unloaded spring height with compression distance height following placement of a 1,296 g ingot on the platform. Also, a pressure gauge was used to measure the amount of pressure required to compress the coil springs a distance of 2 cm. Comparison between WBS and NWBS data were statistically treated using independent t-tests and a one-way ANOVA. There were no significant group differences in weight or height in unloaded coils. However, there were significant (p<0.05) differences in coil spring compression distance under load (WBS = 2.78 ± 0.34 cm; NWBS = 1.52 ± 0.39 cm) and force gauge compression (WBS = 1090.51 ± 88.42 g; NWBS = 1213.12 ± 71.38 g) between groups. While manufacturers’ recommendations to replace a mattress is ranges between 8 and 10 yrs., these results indicate that coil spring weakness may occur before 8 yrs. of use. Weak springs leads to loss of weight bearing capacity of the mattress thereby resulting in sagging upon use. Such sagging which may compromise sleep posture with accompanying back pain and poor sleep quality and quantity.
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Hypoglycemic Potential of Ziziphus spina-christi Fruit on Alloxan induced Hyperglycemic Rats

Hyperglycaemia is a key symptom in diabetes mellitus associated with long term damages, dysfunction and eventually failure of organs, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and blood vessels. This study is to evaluate the hypoglycaemic potential of orally administered aqueous and ethanol extracts of Zyziphus spina-christ fruit on alloxan induced hyperglycaemic Wistar rats. The plant was extracted using maceration using aqueous and 80% ethanol as extraction solvents. Qualitative phytochemical analysis was done. An in vitro assessment of both aqueous and ethanol extract to demonstrate hypoglycaemic activity via inhibition of alpha amylase enzyme and alpha glucosidase enzymes were done. Total of 45 albino rats were used in the study of both sexes divided in 9 groups. Group 1: normal control group, group 2: diabetic control group, group 3: positive control group (metformin 300mg/kg), group 4-6: (150mg/kg, 300mg/kg and 600mg/kg) aqueous extract and group 7-9: (150mg/kg, 300mg/kg and 600mg/kg) ethanol extract. Groups were compared using one way ANOVA for significant differences and Dunnet’s posthoc test was deployed were differences exit. Data were represented as mean ± SEM and p value <0.005 The aqueous and ethanol extract yielded 35.59%% and 46.68% respectively. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins, Saponins, Saponins glycosides, steroids, Phytosteroids, carbohydrate and volatile oil. An in vitro assessment of aqueous and ethanol extract demonstrated hypoglycaemic activity via inhibition of both alpha amylase enzyme and alpha glucosidase enzymes. The percentage inhibition of alpha amylase was presented as IC50 of 0.14, 0.19 and 0.58 for the acarbose, ethanol extract and aqueous extract respectively. Alpha glucosidase inhibition was represented by the IC50 of 0.7mg/ml, 0.9mg/ml and 0.7mg/ml for acarbose, ethanol extracts and aqueous extracts. The aqueous and ethanol extracts significantly decrease the blood glucose level. Elevation of cholesterol and LDL was seen in diabetic control group. The results from the studies showed that Ziziphus spina-Christi fruit aqueous and ethanol extracts has an anti-hyperglycaemic potential which is not a dose dependent both in Vitro and in Vivo. Ziziphus spina-Christi fruit aqueous and ethanol extract also causes a significant reduction in cholesterol level.
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Potential COVID-19 Therapeutics: A Perspective on Pharmacological Properties and Safety

There are no guidelines for pharmacological treatment of COVID-19 disease, but several drugs are being tested every day in search of an optimal therapeutic strategy. The drugs that have been tested, so far, include some antiviral drugs such as danoprevir, favipiravir, darunavir, nelfinavir, remdesivir, umifenovir and the combination lopinavir/ritonavir. Others are drugs targeting inflammatory mediators such as meplazumab, siltuximab, tocilizumab, azithromycin and corticosteroids. Also included in this array of tested drugs are those with pleiotropic actions against SARS-CoV-2 infection like chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, ivermectin and nitazoxanide, postulated as inhibitors of several phases of virus life cycle. Upon diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection, it is pertinent to embark on a treatment approach based on potential antiviral options, adequately managed under proper medical situation. We suggest that, in addition to the antiviral option efforts, drugs targeting inflammatory mediators should be considered.
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Insights into the Potential of Green Algal Polysaccharides Potential to Combat Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus Biofilms

Biofilms are complex sessile microbial community extremely resistant to antibiotics. They typically form on both biotic and abiotic surfaces and are usually associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity in patients in hospital settings. Nosocomial infections are the major cause of infections seen worldwide. Bacterial Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection that affect different parts of the urinary tract in both males and females.
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Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Progression and Quality of Life. Correlation between SSS-IoT Risk Scale Score and the Main Factors Determining the Disease Potential Progression

It has been identified several factors that can determine the severity and progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The natural evolution of this disease has been extensively studied in different populations. However, no practical tool encompasses the main factors determining this disease’s potential progression.
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Potential Molecular Players Against to SARS-CoV-2: A Glyco-Perspective

COVID-19 is caused by SARS-CoV-2 and is associated with the increasing number of cases and deaths and has been declared a pandemic by WHO. The treatment strategy focused on preventing the S protein from binding and penetrating the ACE-2 receptor. In addition, S protein-related molecules such as peptides, blockers, and inhibitors that inhibit S protein cleavage are considered candidate therapeutics.
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Detection Potential of Recently Discovered Techniques for Recovering Latent Fingerprints: A Review

Criminals have an aim, to not leave any evidence behind at the scene of crime. Some offenders assume that objects recovered from aquatic environment have no forensic value therefore; they attempt to wipe out the evidences by throwing them (traces like murder weapon) in water.
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Auditory Evoked Potentials as Yardstick for Tinnitus

: Aiming to evaluate the recent theoretical postulates on tinnitus underscoring the role of thalamocortical neural tracts, the present study 1) explores Middle Latency Response (MLR) as a possible physiological measure of tinnitus: thus investigates the predicted exaggeration of Pa-Na, Na-Pb interpeak amplitudes in tinnitus patients and 2) explores MLR as a prognostic indicator of Tinnitus Retraining Therapy: thus evaluates possible decrease in Pa-Na & Na-Pb amplitude after 2weeks exposure to Tinnitus Retraining Therapy.
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The Roles of IL-33 and TGF-Β1 in the Pathogenesis of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/ Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Potential Biomarkers for Disease Severity

MicroscopyStevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a disease continuum of potentially life threatening, severe allergic drug reactions which result in cellular apoptosis in the skin, mucous membranes, and ocular surface. The exact pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to this apoptosis is unclear but genetic predisposition and abnormal immune regulations play a role.
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Potential of Producing Hydrogen Gas from Straw by Anaerobic Thermal Shocked Biological Sludge to Create Clean Energy

Hydrogen gas has been used widely in the industrial aspect, especially as clean energy. On one hand, it reduces the dependency on fossil fuels; on the other hand, it solves the environmental polluting issue and also reduces the greenhouse gases emitted to the environment. Producing hydrogen by chemical and physical methods require higher fee and investment. Producing hydrogen from renewable biomass, especially agricultural waste such as straws, can produce with low cost and decrease the amount of agricultural waste and pollutions. This article introduces the result of the beginning research to produce hydrogen gas from straw using biotechnology.
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Dual- Energy CT (DECT) Pulmonary Angiography in Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism (PTE): Causes, Semiology and Potential Diagnostic Pitfalls

ObjectivesThe dual-energy computed tomographic (DECT) technique allows the differentiation of materials with large atomic numbers such as iodine. The basic principle of dual-energy CT is material decomposition based on attenuation differences at different energy levels. The parameters for iodine extraction are a minimum value of – 960 HU, and a maximum of –600 HU. Lung parenchyma with normal perfusion in this attenuation range is presented in orange, and an area of decreased perfusion is visualized as an iodine defect area.
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Potentials, Limitations and Future Directions of MR Contrast Media in Ablation Therapies

ImagingIntroductionMR contrast media have become an indispensable part of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, but their roles in ablation therapies are still controversial. The interactions between physical/biological properties of MR contrast media (Longitudinal=T1, transverse=T2 and susceptibility=T2* relaxation times) and diseased tissues (perfusion, edema, hemorrhage and coagulative necrosis) play important roles in differentiating pathologic and ablated tissues.
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Anodizing for Design and Function

Two basic reactions occur during the anodizing of aluminum: 1) the aluminum is consumed and 2) an oxide grows. By accepting this statement as true, the anodizing process can be viewed as a corrosion process, and anodizing can be modeled using the Tafel Equation. Anodizing process parameters of electrolyte chemistry and concentration, temperature, aluminum substrate resistance and current density are presented as they relate to the Tafel Equation and how they impact the anodic aluminum oxide structure and properties. Understanding this relationship is consequent in making anodizing an engineering process, one that enables tuning the structure such that it yields distinct characteristics to fulfill design and application requirements.
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Editorial Board Members Related to Potential

Robert R. Redfield

Professor
Department of Immunology and Microbiology
University of Maryland
United States

Hasan Sarptaş

Assistant Professor
Ege University Solar Energy Institute
Turkey

VANA SPOULOU

Associate Professor
Department of Paediatrics
University of Athens Medical School
Greece

Zubair M Ahmed

Associate Professor
Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery
School of Medicine
University of Maryland
United States

Pramod Bhujangrao Khedekar

Professor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University
India

Faheem Ahmad

Assistant Professor
Department of Botany
Aligarh Muslim University
India

Anuradha Ratna

Department of Medicine
University of Massachusetts Medical School
USA

Sameh S.M. Soliman

Assistant Professor
Department of Medicinal Chemistry
University of Sharjah
UAE

Kam C. Yeung

Associate Professor
Department of Biochemistry & Cancer Biology
University of Toledo College of Medicine
United States

Zafar K. Khan

Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Drexel University
United States
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