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Articles Related to viruses

Association of Viruses with Aplastic Anemia: A Case Control Study

Several viruses are often believed to be associated with acquired aplastic anemia. There is paucity of literature proving the association between viruses and aplastic anemia. We aimed to study the association of aplastic anemia with Human Parvovirus B19 (B19V), Epstein Barr virus (EBV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Hepatitis viruses, Measles virus (MV), Varicella Zoster virus (VZV) and Adenovirus (AdV). Between January 2020 to December 2020, confirmed cases of aplastic anemia and age and sex matched controls of iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in the study. They were tested for the above- mentioned viruses for antigen and/or IgM antibody by ELISA and/or nucleic acid by Real Time PCR in serum samples. Relevant history was collected. Cases were followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months after enrollment for recording the outcome. Total 68 cases and 34 controls were included in the study of which 61(89.70%) cases and 12(38.23%) controls were positive for markers of at-least one of the 10 viruses studied. B19V, EBV, CMV and Hepatitis B virus were found to be significantly associated with aplastic anemia. Five patients died within 12 months. Mortality was not associated with viral infections. Viral infections may play a role in pathogenesis of acquired aplastic anemia.
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Immunodeficiency and Microbial Infections

Immunodeficiency refers to failure of immune system to encounter infections by different microbial pathogens such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and protozoan. This is called acquired or secondary immunodeficiency syndrome (SIS).
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Meningoencephalitis due to Enteroviral Infection – An Often Overlooked Etiology

Enteroviruses are responsible for causing several recent well-publicized outbreaks in the United States, including gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections. Enteroviruses are also capable of infecting the central nervous system, leading to manifestations of meningitis and encephalitis. Because enteroviruses are often overlooked as the etiology of CNS infections, we explore data from national surveillance, typical presentation and diagnostic information, as well as patterns of infection and transmission in an effort to remind practitioners to be mindful of this frequent cause of infection and its propensity to be spread from person to person.
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Surgical Wound Management in Dogs using an Improved Stable Chlorine Dioxide Antiseptic Solution.

Three surgical case reports are presented to demonstrate the clinical efficacy of using an improved aqueous solution of chlorine dioxide complex (160 ppm) as a topical antiseptic in the post operative management of serious wounds in dogs. In vitro studies are included to demonstrate the antiseptic properties of this new chlorine dioxide complex.
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Editorial Board Members Related to viruses

K. RAMANATHAN

Associate Professor
Industrial Biotechnology Division
School of Bio Sciences and Technology
VIT University
INDIA

Paban K. Dash

Senior scientist
Defence Research & Development Establishment
India

Hazem Aqel

Professor
College of Applied Medical Sciences
King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences
Saudi Arabia

ROBERT TODD STRIKER

Associate Professor of Medicine
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
University of Wisconsin
United States

Jeffrey E. Lee

Assistant Professor
Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology
University of Toronto
Canada

Roger M. Loria

Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Virginia Commonwealth University
United States

RAJNISH S. DAVE

Associate Scientist
Department of Neuroscience
Temple University
United States

Sheng-Fan Wang

Associate Professor
Department of Laboratory Science and Biotechnology
Kaohsiung Medical University
Taiwan

Mario P. S. Chin

Assistant Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Temple University
United States

Jose V. Torres

Professor
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology
School of Medicine
University of California at Davis
United States
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