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Articles Related to Glomerulonephritis

Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever and Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis (RPGN): A New Persuasion

Dengue is a prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in tropical and subtropical areas of the globe. Dengue clinical manifestations include asymptomatic infections; undifferentiated fever; dengue fever, which is characterized by fever, headache, retro orbital pain, myalgia, and arthralgia; and a severe form of the disease denominated dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, characterized by hemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, and bleeding tendency. However, atypical manifestations, such as liver, central nervous system, and cardiac involvement, have been increasingly reported called expanded dengue syndrome. The renal complications of dengue virus infection cover a wide spectrum of manifestations from acute kidney injury to glomerular injury with nephritic/nephrotic syndrome. Majority of cases remain symptom free and show full recovery. We report a 55 years old lady with atypical and rare presentation of dengue disease marked by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Condition improved after initial 5 days pulse methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone therapy and mycophenolate mofetil. The main mechanism of dengue glomerulonephritis is still unknown though both direct viral infection and immune mediated damage have been suggested to be the cause. To avoid otherwise preventable morbidity and mortality, physicians should have a high index of suspicion for renal complications in patients with dengue illness and should manage this accordingly
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Vasculitis Associated with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

A patient is present who has chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and developed a vasculitis involving the skin and large vessels along with immune complex mediated glomerulosclerosis. Both vasculitis and immune complex nephritis are rare manifestations of CLL.
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Tolerating Extreme Hyperkalemia in a Non-Compliant Dialysis Patient

Dialysis patients are known to tolerate high potassium due to the chronic hyperkalemia that is inherent in their disease. Despite this, most reports of extremely high potassium (>9 mmol/L) are in the setting of cardiac arrest. We describe the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian male with past medical history significant for end stage renal disease known to be non-adherent to a low potassium diet as well as missed dialysis appointments.
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