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Articles Related to Gynecology Journal

Increased High Mobility Group Protein A2/SMAD3 Relates to Ovarian Cancer Progression

The high mortality associated with ovarian cancer is generally related to the development of drug-resistant disease. HMGA2 protein, a member of the high-mobility group AT-hook (HMGA) family of non-histone chromatin binding factors, is overexpressed in high-grade serous ovarian and tubal carcinomas, though little is known about its contribution to disease progression and drug resistance. We sought to assess whether compositional changes in HMGA2 production were associated with ovarian cancer progression.
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Molecular Mechanism Linking BRCA1 Dysfunction to High Grade Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancers with Peritoneal Permeability and Ascites

Ovarian cancer constitutes the second most common gynecological cancer with a five-year survival rate of 40%. Among the various histotypes associated with hereditary ovarian cancer, high-grade serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma (HGSEOC) is the most predominant and women with inherited mutations in BRCA1 have a lifetime risk of 40-60%. HGSEOC is a challenge for clinical oncologists, due to late presentation of patient, diagnosis and high rate of relapse. Ovarian tumors have a wide range of clinical presentations including development of ascites as a result of deregulated endothelial function thereby causing increased vascular permeability of peritoneal vessels.
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Anti-GnRH Receptor Monoclonal Antibodies, First-In-Class GnRH Analog

A monoclonal antibody (Mab) designated as GHR106 was generated against the extracellular domain (N1-29 synthetic peptide) of human gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor. It is a first-in-class GnRH analog and can serve as a drug candidate for potential applications in the treatment of human cancers and/or fertility regulations.
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A Laparoscopic Assisted Minilaparotomy Hysterectomy approach for Very Large Fibroid Uteri of more than 1000 grams – A Preliminary Study

Minilaparotomy has been used for tubal sterilization for decades. It became a new surgical idea described by some who performed minilaparotomy hysterectomy and achieved outcomes that were less invasive than those of traditional open laparotomy. Pelosi and Pelosi 2004 reported a minilaparotomy procedure in patients in whom vaginal hysterectomy was considered contraindicated. Their procedure offered a safe alternative with minimal access and good outcome.
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