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Effect of Cold Wet sheet Pack on Body Temperature among Healthy Individuals - Result of a Single Arm Study

Hydrotherapy, as the name suggests is the most ancient method of treating diseases by using water in its various forms. The use of water for therapy has been around for hundreds of years. The cold wet sheet pack is one of the common hydrotherapy techniques used for reducing body weight. There have been no documented studies conducted to scientifically evaluate this effect. This study is an attempt to examine the effect of cold wet sheet pack on body temperature. Application of cold wet sheet pack for particular duration increases the body temperature by utilization of calories thus may leads to reduction of bodyweight. Thirty healthy volunteers were randomly selected from medical students enrolled in a naturopathic programme. The participants were of both sexes aged between 18 and 25 years under normal Body mass index (18.5-25). A cold (20 oC± 1 oC) wet sheet pack has given to each of the participants for one hour duration. The outcome measures were resting blood pressure, body temperature and pulse rate. 30 Participants were successfully completed the study, all participants have shown a raise in body temperature after intervention which was statistically significant (P=0.003). There is no significant change in blood pressure and pulse rate. Also there was a week positive correlation between body mass index and body temperature. A cold wet sheet pack for one hour has shown a raise in body temperature, which indicate that the cold wet sheet pack have a role in reducing body weight by utilizing the calories. However, these observations are based on a short term single arm pre-post design on healthy students. A cold wet sheet pack has been demonstrated in this study to have a significant effect in increasing body temperature and shows perspiration by utilization of calories. Large scale randomized control trials in obese patients over a longer period are warranted to conform the results which was uncovered in this study.
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Studies on the Nutritional Status of School Age Children in Drought Affected Desert Environment of Western Rajasthan, India

Three stage sampling technique adopted covering 1497 school age children from 24 villages of Jodhpur district and examined at household level for their nutritional anthropometry, dietary and nutritional deficiencies. Growth retardation was observed. Wasting was in 22.4 percent children significantly higher in boys. Stunting and underweight was 36.6 and 43.9 percent (Less than Median–2SD).
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Chocolate Milk Sweetened With Stevia: Acceptance by Children

We investigated children’s acceptance of chocolate non-fat milk, sweetened with sucrose and stevia (Enliten®) with eighty-four children (11-14 years old) under four sweetness conditions. Samples were evaluated with a structured 7-point hedonic scale, ranging from “super bad” to “super good”, for color, sweetness, flavor, texture and overall liking. The chocolate milk with 18g of sucrose with stevia was more accepted; chocolate milk with no sugar added (NSA) and with stevia had lower notes.
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Nutritional Aspects in Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome, of a progressive character, that has a limited prognostic factor and manifested by various extracardiac aspects. It represents a serious and growing public health problem worldwide, both for its high prevalence and the severity of its clinical manifestations, being the final common pathway of most diseases. Undernutrition is often associated with HF, especially in the later stages of the disease, and may chronically reach cardiac cachexia, a severe manifestation related to poor clinical prognosis.
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Editorial Board Members Related to calorie

DONALD K. INGRAM

Adjunct Professor
Pennington Biomedical Research Center
Louisiana State University
United States

TIFFANY STEWART

Associate Professor
Pennington Biomedical Research Center (PBRC)
United States
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