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Articles Related to metronidazole

Efficacy of Vitamin C Vaginal Suppository in Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis a Randomized Controlled Trial

The aim of the current study was to compare the efficacy and side effects of vaginal vitamin C suppository and vaginal metronidazole in treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Double-blind randomized controlled trial. The study included women who presented to the outpatient gynecological clinic with a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by amsels criteria. The included eligible women were randomly allocated in one of two groups: group I, including women who received vitamin C vaginal suppository once daily at bed time for 6 days; and group II, including women who received metronidazole 500 mg vaginal suppository once daily at bed time for 6 days. All included women were reviewed in 8-14 days after completion of treatment for reevaluation.
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Epidemiological Characteristics of Infections Associated with Culture Isolated Fusobacterium Nucleatum: A Retrospective Analysis

The pathogenic potential of Fusobacterium nucleatum and its significance in infections has gained new interest. This retrospective study assessed the epidemiology of patients with infections and culture isolated F. nucleatum at two county hospitals in Houston, Texas. Clinical, epidemiological and microbiological data were obtained from the electronic medical record for both Ben Taub General Hospital and Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2011.
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Extensive Worm Infestation: A Case Report

Ascariasis is the most common helminthic infection in the world and is seen mostly in the developing countries of Asia. We report a case of heavy worm infestation in a 2-year-old child who presented with worms in small bowel, common bile duct and liver with abscesses. He was managed conservatively and recovered well without any sequalae.
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Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon Mimicking an Abdominal Wall Cellulitis

Cutaneous metastases from abdominal malignancies are rare and have been reported in less than 5% of patients [1]. Furthermore, metastases in patients suffering from colorectal neoplasia are even rarer entity. Tan et al, among 2538 of the new cases of colorectal cancer over the period of 6 years, reported only 3 cases (0.1%) with cutaneous deposits [1]. Presentation varies from cutaneous or subcutaneous small nodules, rash or large fungating lesions [1-4]. Inevitably, their presence implies the disease progression, and poor prognosis with the reported survival between 1 to 34 months [2,3,5].
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