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Articles Related to Spine

Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Thoracic Spine

Solitary bone plasmacytomas account for approximately 5% of plasma cell malignancies. These lesions are recognized as pre-malignant, if untreated, at least 50% will progress to multiple myeloma within 5 years of diagnosis. We present a case of a 54 year old male patient whom presented to our unit complaining of progressive axial backache complicated by acute onset paraplegia of 8 hours duration. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete L1 sensory level and no motor function of his lower limbs which had power 0/5 in all dermatomes (Frankel B).
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Psychosocial Flag Signs in Patients with Compensable Occupational Lumbar Spine Injuries

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to examine the prevalence of psychological flag signs (yellow, black and blue) in workers who had sustained a low back injury and to examine the relationship between the presence and number of these signs and the level of pain, disability, anxiety, depression and ability to work. Methods: This study involved a review of the electronic files of injured workers with an active work-related claim related to the lumbar spine. The information on demographics, presence and number of psychosocial and workplace risk factors, level of disability as measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), pain intensity as measured by the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), and anxiety and depression as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was extracted from standardized forms.
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MRI of the Psoas Major Muscle: Origin, Attachment, Anatomical Variants and Correlation with the Lumbar Disc Extrusion

To verify the psoas major muscle (PMM) anatomical origin and variants, to evaluate the PMM attachment to the lumbar disc and variants, and to search for correlation between the anatomic variants of PMM attachment to the disc and disc extrusion.
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Vertebro-Spinal Hydatidosis: Case Report

Hydatid disease is caused by the larval form of parasitic tapeworm; Echinococcus granulosus. Primary spinal hydatid disease is rare. Primary bone localization is rare and it accounts between 0.5% and 4%. Spinal localization accounts for less than 1%. The infection may be misdiagnosed initially.
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Hydrocephalus in Congenital Rubella Syndrome: A Case Report

The Congenital Rubella Syndrome is a multisystemic disease and CNS involvement occurs in the form of microcephaly, mental/motor disabilities, leptomeningitis, encephalitis, vascular damage and retardation of myelination. We report a case of gross non-communicating hydrocephalus in a neonate of Congenital Rubella Syndrome which is a rare presentation.
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Editorial Board Members Related to Spine

Gianluca Vadala

Orthopaedic Surgeon
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery
Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome
Italy

Fabrizio Russo

MD
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery
Bio-Medico University
Italy

Alfredo Figueiredo

MD
Orthopaedic Surgery Department
Coimbra University Hospital
Portugal

Keyvan Mostofi

Department of Neurosurgery
University of UCL
France

Inbo Han

Associate professor
Department of Neurosurgery
CHA University
South Korea

Pramod Devkota

Associate Professor
Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma surgery
Patan Academy of Health Sciences
Nepal
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