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Articles Related to TIC

A rare case of levofloxacin-induced fatal hypoglycemia in a non-diabetic patient with the review of literature

Levofloxacin, a broad-spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is rarely reported to cause life-threatening adverse effects, such as severe hypoglycemia resulting in coma. We report a rare case of hypoglycemia in an elderly non- diabetic patient induced by levofloxacin. A 61-year-old male patient was admitted with severe hypoglycemia. His past medical history revealed treatment with levofloxacin for pneumonia.
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The Use of Silver Nanoparticles Prepared by The Green Method to Reduce The Concentration of Nickel in Water

The present work aims to study a convenient and environmentally friendly method for the green synth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs based on lemon juice extract. The biomolecules contained in lemon extract act as self- reducing and stabilizing agents. The optimal solution for the synthesis of AgNPs was determined by varying silver nitrate concentrations. A surface plasmon resonance system identified the synthesized silver nanoparticles by their color change from colorless to dark brown. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were characterized by Uv-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and FTIR spectroscopy. As a result of UV-visible spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) can be determine
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Anti-Infectives do not Impact Treatment Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: a Single Center Retrospective Analysis

Immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have provided groundbreaking advancements for a variety of malignancies. It has been of recent interest to identify predictive indicators of response to improve cancer management using immunotherapy. The intestinal microbiome has been recognized as a potential predictor of ICI anti- tumor activity. Antibiotics reduce diversity the overall composition of the gut microbiota, with effects seen as quickly as in a single day. Post-antibiotic dysbiosis recovery varies depending on type and duration of exposure. Preclinical studies in mice with advanced cancer treated with broad spectrum antibiotics have been associated with resistance to ICI treatment.
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Ground Water Quality Assessment of Lalgudi Block, Tiruchirappalli District by Using Gis

Water is a compound and may occur in a liquid form or in a solid form or in a gaseous form. All these three forms of water are extremely useful to all, providing the luxuries and comforts, in addition to fulfilling basic necessities of life. The present study aims to determine the ground water quality in Lalgudi Taluk. Water samples were collected from fifteen samplings points.
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Chemicals Disinfections and Their Effects on The Dimensional Stability of Alginate: Systematic Review

Dental practice involves a risk of exposure to microorganisms causing many infectious diseases. The risk of contamination starts at the beginning of the prosthetic workflow through impressions. Various chemical disinfection protocols for dental impressions are reported in the literature.
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Robotic Assisted Vs Traditional Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy Peri-Operative Outcomes: A Comparative Single Operator Study

The European Association of Urology currently recommends partial nephrectomy as the preferred management for localised cT1 renal tumours, irrespective of surgical approach. With the advent of robotic assisted partial nephrectomy, there is growing evidence that warm ischaemia time may be reduced compared to the traditional laparoscopic approach.
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Antioxidant and Anti-Apoptotic Effects of Jojoba Seed Extracts on Hepg2 Cells: In Vitro Strategy Against Hyperglycemia and Hyperinsulinemia

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Minimization of Agricultural Waste through Energy Recovery. Evaluation of the Production of Green Biofuels Using Theoretical Models

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Zoning and Modeling of Noise Pollution of Mashhad Police Highway by Statistical Technique, GIS Software and TNM2.5 Model

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Machine Learning Prediction of Response towards Anti-VEGF Injections in Patients with DME: Prediction of Post-Injection CST

Diabetic macular edema (DME) has become one of the most potential complications that results in loss of vision in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Treatment outcomes that have been predicted directly with advent of machine learning (ML) methods after the initial anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) injection, has become extremely vital in the management of DME. Purpose: The aim of this study is to analyze the efficiency of the ML regression models which were developed and validated to predict the possible post-injection central subfield thickness (CST) value and distant vision best corrected visual acuity (DV BCVA) in eyes with DME before the anti-VEGF injection is administered at either treatment initiation or during treatment monitoring. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted in Medical Research Foundation, Chennai, India from January 2010 to December 2020. The model development emphasized on an ensemble ML system consisting of four ML models that were developed and trained independently using the clinical parameters to predict the post injection CST value. The dataset consisting of 906 patients with total of 1874 samples [Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and clinical parameters] were divided into trained and test set, and the model was validated on test dataset. The predicted CST values was then compared against the respective sample’s post injection actual CST value. The comparative results were measured in terms of Correlation Coefficient and Mean Absolute Relative Error (MARE). Results: On evaluation, we found that Support Vector Regression (SVR) with linear kernel performed best among the other models with four different scenarios in term of both CST and DVBCVA prediction with correlation coefficient of 0.65, 0.73, 0.75, 0.85 and 0.83, 0.87, 0.89 and 0.92 respectively.
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Assessment of Antioxidant and Antineoplastic Activities Blumea Lacera (Burn. F) Leaves

Blumea lacera (Burn. f.) DC. (Family: Asteraceae) is an important member of Bangladeshi natural plant resource and it is an herbaceous weed locally known as Kukursunga. Different parts of this plant are used traditionally to cure various diseases. But detail study on the antioxidant and antineoplastic potentials of Blumea lacera leaves, has not yet been done. Aim of this study is to examine the antioxidant and antineoplastic properties and quantify the different type of phytochemical content of the methanolic extract of leaves of Blumea lacera (MELB). MELB contained a rich polyphenol, flavonol, flavonoid and proanthocyanidins. MELB showed moderate cytotoxic effect against Artemia salina (brine shrimp nauplii) where its LD50 values was 66.12 μg/ml. In vitro antioxidant assay, MELB exhibited a remarkable capacity to scavenge the tested reactive species. MELB scavenged DPPH with an IC50 of 33.64 μg/mL and 42.69 μg/mL, respectively. In vivo antineoplastic assay, MELB significantly (P<0.05) decreased viable cell count and increased the survival time of EAC cell bearing mice. Hematological profiles were also restored significantly (P<0.05) to normal levels in MELB treated mice as compared to untreated EAC control mice. In addition, fluorescence microscopic view of EAC cells derived from MELB-treated group showed apoptotic characteristics in treated cells compared to untreated EAC control. our findings suggest that methanolic extract of Blumea lacera leaves(MELB) might be a potential agent with antioxidant properties for prevention of cancer and has the merit for further investigation in isolating its active constituents.
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Investigation of Neuroprotective Effects of Ripasudil in Mechanic Optic Nerve Injury Model

Purpose: We aimed to create mechanic optic nerve injury model in rats and investigate the neuroprotective effects of ripasudil on retinal ganglion cells. Study Design: Experimental study Methods: Mechanic optic nerve injury model was created in the right eyes of male Wistar rats (n=15). Rats were divided into three groups: glaucoma model with sham treatment (group1) and 20 µM intravitreal ripasudil treatment (group 2) and 50 µM intravitreal ripasudil treatment (group 3). Treatment was applied intravitreally and rats were sacrificed at the end of 4 weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Brn-3a antibody,anti- Iba1 was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results: The number of Brn-3a positive RGC in the mechanical optic nerve injury model was 5.33 ± 2.08 (min: 3, max: 7) in sham group, 10.25 ± 2.63 (min: 8, max: 14) in 20 µM group and 16.75 ± 5.43 (min:9, max: 21) in 50 µM group (p <0.05). GFAP positive RGC counts were recorded as 24.33 ± 2.08 (min: 22, max: 26) in sham group, 16.75 ± 1.70 (min: 15, max: 19) in 20 µM group and 13.00 ± 4.08 (min:10 , max: 19) in 50 µM group (p <0.05). Ripasudil treatment also decreased Iba1 expression in the retina of mechanic optic nerve injury groups. In addition, ripasudil treatment prevented apoptotic cell death by increasing Bcl-xL protein expression and preserved Tfam protein expression in the retina. Conclusions: Our experimental study has shown that ripasudil is neuropreotective in mechanical optic nerve injury model.
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Identification of Novel De-Novo 12q14 -12q22 Gene Mutations and MTHFR C677T Gene Polymorphism Increase Genetic Susceptibility in Hirschsprung Disease - A Rare Case Report

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Association of Viruses with Aplastic Anemia: A Case Control Study

Several viruses are often believed to be associated with acquired aplastic anemia. There is paucity of literature proving the association between viruses and aplastic anemia. We aimed to study the association of aplastic anemia with Human Parvovirus B19 (B19V), Epstein Barr virus (EBV), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Hepatitis viruses, Measles virus (MV), Varicella Zoster virus (VZV) and Adenovirus (AdV). Between January 2020 to December 2020, confirmed cases of aplastic anemia and age and sex matched controls of iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in the study. They were tested for the above- mentioned viruses for antigen and/or IgM antibody by ELISA and/or nucleic acid by Real Time PCR in serum samples. Relevant history was collected. Cases were followed up at 3, 6 and 12 months after enrollment for recording the outcome. Total 68 cases and 34 controls were included in the study of which 61(89.70%) cases and 12(38.23%) controls were positive for markers of at-least one of the 10 viruses studied. B19V, EBV, CMV and Hepatitis B virus were found to be significantly associated with aplastic anemia. Five patients died within 12 months. Mortality was not associated with viral infections. Viral infections may play a role in pathogenesis of acquired aplastic anemia.
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A Review: State of Plastic Pollution in Nigeria and Measure to Tackle Them

Marine organisms, scientists, governmental and non-governmental organizations face a significant challenge as a result of the ubiquitousness of plastic and microplastics in the aquatic environment, particularly in Nigeria where there is little or no policy put in place to address the issue of microplastic pollution. Nigeria ranks ninth globally in terms of its contribution to ocean plastic pollution and currently does not have a federal ban on the majority of single-use plastics and equipment. This paper aimed to present the status of plastic pollution in Nigeria and some policies to curb the menace. Data analysis reveals that Bayesa, Katsina, Lagos, and Oyo are the four states that generate the majority of the plastic waste in Nigeria. The number of industries, markets, and urbanization in a location affect the quantity of plastic waste that is produced there and is not dependent on the population. This paper makes some policy suggestions and recommendations such as the federal prohibition and taxation on the use of plastic, ocean clean-up, technological innovation that will support the recycling industry in Nigeria, and the need for additional plastic research. Nigeria can apply the most recent plastic waste management strategies in European and Asian nations as a model and adopt them to reduce marine plastic pollution.
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Ordered Growth of Anodic Aluminum Oxide in Galvanostatic and Galvanostatic-Potentiostatic Modes

The results are presented of obtaining anodic aluminum oxide with an ordered pore arrangement by employing two anodizing modes - galvanostatic mode and combined (galvanostatic + potentiostatic) mode, at high values of the current density and voltage. Use has been made of an oxalate electrolyte and a complex electrolyte comprising oxalic acid and phosphoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to investigate the surface morphology of the barrier and porous layers and to determine pore sizes and inter-pore distance.
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Anodizing for Design and Function

Two basic reactions occur during the anodizing of aluminum: 1) the aluminum is consumed and 2) an oxide grows. By accepting this statement as true, the anodizing process can be viewed as a corrosion process, and anodizing can be modeled using the Tafel Equation. Anodizing process parameters of electrolyte chemistry and concentration, temperature, aluminum substrate resistance and current density are presented as they relate to the Tafel Equation and how they impact the anodic aluminum oxide structure and properties. Understanding this relationship is consequent in making anodizing an engineering process, one that enables tuning the structure such that it yields distinct characteristics to fulfill design and application requirements.
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Recent Developments in Human Odor Detection Technologies

Human odor detection technologies have drawn attention due to the wide possibility of potential applications they open up in areas such as biometrics, criminal investigation and forensics, search for survivors under rubble, and security checkpoint screening. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been the most successful and powerful analytical approach developed to date for human odor analysis, and hundreds of human odorants have been identified using this tool.
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Electronic-nose Applications in Forensic Science and for Analysis of Volatile Biomarkers in the Human Breath

The application of electronic-nose (E-nose) technologies in forensic science is a recent new development following a long history of progress in the development of diverse applications in the related biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. Data from forensic analyses must satisfy the needs and requirements of both the scientific and legal communities. The type of data collected from electronic-nose devices provides a means of identifying specific types of information about the chemical nature of evidentiary objects and samples under investigation using aroma signature profiles of complex gaseous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from manufactured products and parts of the human body. E-nose analyses also provide useful qualitative information about the physicochemical characteristics and metabolic conditions of human subjects without the need for time-consuming analyses to identify all chemical components in human-derived volatile mixtures.
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Analysis of Sweat Simulant Mixtures using Multiplexed Arrays of DNA-Carbon Nanotube Vapor Sensors

Carbon nanotube (NT) based electronic vapor sensors were tested against synthetic sweat solutions, consisting of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in saline, in order to probe the device ability to analyze and differentiate vapors derived from complex biological samples.
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Characteristic Human Scent Compounds Trapped on Natural and Synthetic Fabrics as analyzed by SPME-GC/MS

The collection of human odor volatiles is of interest to forensic applications as a path to investigate canine scent discriminations in legal investigations. A study using a selected array of previously identified human odor compounds has been conducted to determine the retention and release capabilities of five (5) natural and synthetic fabric types, cotton (mercerized fabric and gauze matrix), polyester, rayon and wool.
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The Effects of the Film Thickness and Roughness in the Anodization Process of Very Thin Aluminum Films

The anodization of aluminum foils having micrometer thickness is a common process and results in hexagonally self-ordered alumina membranes. However, anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes fabricated from nanometer-thin films present new challenges to the anodization process, since aluminum films adheres poorly on supporting substrates and the smoothness of the film is highly related to the kind of substrate.
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Anodic Oxidation of Titanium in Sulphuric Acid and Phosphoric Acid Electrolytes

Anodisation of pure titanium has been carried out in sulphuric and in phosphoric acid solutions at potentials ranging from 50 to 150V. The SEM and AFM morphological analysis indicates that, within this potential range, oxidation in sulphuric acid solution produces better developed mesoporous oxide layers.
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Fabrication of Ordered Arrays of Anodic Aluminum Oxide Pores with Interpore Distance Smaller than the Pitch of Nano-pits formed by Ion Beam Etching

We investigated a method for preparation of ordered nanopore arrays with the interpore distance of 60 nm by guided self-organization of anodic aluminum oxide with a prepatterned array of pits in the starting Al film.
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Preparation of Large Area Anodic Alumina Membranes and their Application to Thin Film Fuel Cell

The design of an electrochemical reactor for the preparation of self-supported comparatively thin (up to 10 μm) and large area (up to 50 cm2) anodic alumina membranes is described allowing growth of porous alumina at high applied potential (up to 150 V) without burning.
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Fabrication of Vertical Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanowire Arrays by Two-Step Electroplating Method into Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template

Vertical Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanowire arrays have been synthesized via two-step electroplating method into anodized aluminum oxide template. For deposition of CZTS nanowires, anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) was used as the growth mask for the growth of the nanowires. AAO templates with hole sizes of 70 nm in diameter were used in the experiments.
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Fabrication and Luminescence of Anodic Alumina with Incorporated Vanadyl Citrate Chelate Anions

Anodic aluminum oxide doped with vanadyl citrate chelate complex anions was formed by a two-step self-organized anodization in 2 wt. % sulfuric acid containing 0.04 M V2O5 and 0.08 M citric acid at voltage range 13-23 V, and at 0 and 15 oC. The combination of two temperatures and at least four voltages (depending on the applied temperature) was applied as the operating conditions of anodization.
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Synthesis of BaTiO3 Nanowires via Anodic Aluminum Oxide Template Method Assisted by Vacuum-and-Drop Loading

In this paper, we report on the synthesis of BaTiO3 nanowires via the anodic aluminum oxide template method. To fill in the precursors of BaTiO3 into anodic aluminum oxide templates, the vacuum and drop loading method developed in our previous study was used. Ba(CH3COO)2 (barium acetate) and C12H28O4Ti (tetraisopropyl orthotitanate) were used as Ba and Ti sources, respectively. Anodic aluminum oxide membranes with the through-hole diameter of ~200 nm were used as the template for BaTiO3 nanowires.
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Editorial Board Members Related to TIC

Peter Parker

Professor
London Research Institute
United Kingdom

Meric Koksal Akkoc

Professor
Faculty of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Yeditepe University
Turkey

Yasuo Iwasaki

Professor
Department of Neurology
Toho University Omori Hospital
Japan

Catherine Ortega

Department of Physical Therapy
University of Texas Health Science Center At San Antonio
USA

Bidyut Roy

Professor
Human Genetics Unit
Indian Statistical Institute
India

Dilek Battal

Associate Professor
Department of Toxicology
Mersin University
Turkey

Ranjana Bhattacharjee

Molecular Geneticist
Bioscience Center
IITA, Ibadan
Nigeria

Jean-François Desaphy

Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy & Drug Sciences
University of Bari
Italy

Ayman Abdel-Aziz Swelum

Department of Animal Production
College of Food and Agriculture Sciences
King Saud University
Saudi Arabia

ALI H. MOKDAD

Professor of Global Health
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME)
University of Washington
United States
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